Curriculum Guide

Graduation Requirements
Curriculum-related Policies
Art
Business Education
Engineering
English
Family and Consumer Sciences
Health
Literacy
Mathematics
Music
Physical Education
Science
Second Languages
Social Studies
BOCES Career and Technical Education

Introduction

The Schalmont High School Curriculum and Planning Guide is designed to help students plan a successful, enjoyable high school experience. Planning a course of studies is one of the most important phases of a student’s entire educational program. Students are encouraged to work with their parents and guidance counselors to plan a challenging course of studies that will help them reach their educational and post-secondary school goals.

This guide outlines graduation requirements, addresses questions commonly asked about high school programs, and provides a detailed list and description of courses offered to students. If you have questions about any of the content in this guide, please contact one of the guidance counselors listed to the right.

Students begin to plan a high school course of studies while in the eighth grade, working with counselors at Schalmont Middle School. Students then continue planning their course of studies with high school counselors. Guidance counselors maintain a complete set of records on each student and are the best resource for assistance with planning an appropriate course of study. Parents are encouraged to call for an appointment if any questions arise regarding the planning of their child’s high school experience.

Grade level promotion requirements

To provide enough units for graduation, each student is required to take five subjects plus physical education each year. In addition, the following requirements for promotion to the next grade level have been established.

Grade Level/Class Units of Credit Required for Promotion

  • Grade 9/freshman: Promotion from 8th grade
  • Grade 10/sophomore: 5.0 units, 1 of which must be English or Social Studies
  • Grade 11/junior: 11 units, 3 of which must be in English or Social Studies
  • Grade 12/senior: 17 units, 5 of which must be English or Social Studies

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Graduation Requirements

Regents or Advanced Regents Diplomas

A student must earn 22 credits. All students must carry at least six courses per semester, one of which must be physical education.

Students must pass all  five of the applicable Regents exams below with a grade of 65 or higher  in order to receive a high school diploma:

  • 1 English Regents
  • 1 Math Regents
  • 1 Science Regents
  • 1 Social Studies Regents
  • It is expected that any additional math, science or social studies Regents offered by the state will count for the fifth required examination or the CDOS certification.

Tests Required for Advanced Regents Diploma

  • Integrated Algebra
  • Geometry
  • Trigonometry
  • (2) Science Regents (One of which must be Living Environment)
  • Global Studies
  • U. S. History and Government
  • English
  • Second Language

Credits Required  for Regents Diploma / Advanced Regents Diploma

  • English: 4.0 / 4.0
  • Social Studies: 4.0 / 4.0
  • Mathematics: 3.0  / 3.0
  • Science: 3.0 / 3.0
  • Arts: 1.0  / 1.0
  • Health: 0.5 / 0.5
  • Physical Education: 2.0 / 2.0
  • Second Language: 1.0  / 3.0
  • Electives: 3.0  / 1.0
  • Career & Financial Management: 0.5 / 0.5
  • Total:  22.0  /  22.0

Regents Diploma with Honors

A student must have an average score of 90 on all required Regents examinations, including: English language arts (ELA), mathematics, science, U.S. History and Government, and Global History and Geography.

Regents Diploma with Advanced Designation with Honors

A student needs to have an average score of 90 on all required Regents examinations, including: English language arts (ELA), two (or three) mathematics, two sciences (one each in physical science and life science), U.S. History and Government, Global History and Geography, and languages other than English (LOTE).

Local Diplomas

Local Diplomas will be available to some students with an IEP or 504. Additionally, some regular education students might eligible. Counselors will guide each student individually though this process.

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School Policies Related to Curriculum

Scheduling Timetable and Guidelines

Counselors will meet with students to review their High School plan to help develop the coming school years’ schedule. Counselors will take into consideration classroom teacher requests, students and parent requests as well as students’ post-secondary goals to help the student create an appropriate schedule for students. A course selection sheet will be finalized and must be signed by a parent or guardian and returned to the guidance and counseling office in order to assure that requests are in place in selected courses. After the master schedule is created a student’s schedule will be developed. Where classes are canceled or a conflict arises in a student’s schedule, different courses will need to be selected.

In most cases students will be notified before the end of the current school year of the classes that will be on their schedule for the fall. Students have until the end of their current school year to make any adjustments to those classes before the master schedule is finalized over the summer. In those cases where students request changes, parents will again be asked to sign off on those changes in a request sheet.

Dropping/Adding a Course

Schedules will not be altered to accommodate teacher requests, early dismissal or late arrival. The official add/drop period is five weeks after the beginning of a full-year course and 2.5 weeks after the beginning of a half-year course. Students dropping courses after these deadlines will receive a Drop/Failed (DF) grade on their report card. This will carry the numerical equivalent of 50. 

All requests for dropping courses must be accompanied by a special schedule change form and contact from parent/ guardian either by note or phone call. Students may not drop a course that is a requirement for graduation. In all cases, students must retain five courses plus physical education as a minimum course load.

A schedule change due to academic difficulty may be considered prior to the drop period deadlines provided:

  • A request from a parent or guardian is made.
  • Student is carrying the required number of courses.
  • Student has made a sincere effort to succeed.
  • The student, parent, teacher and guidance counselor are in agreement regarding the change.
  • Class balance is not disrupted by the change.
  • Such student may then have to add a course in its place during second semester.

Advanced Placement (AP) Courses

AP courses prepare students to take the College Board AP exams in May. Colleges may give credit and/or advanced course placement to students who take and score well on their AP exams.

Honors (H) Courses

These courses are enriched beyond the curriculum subscribed by the NYS Regents syllabus. Students are recommended for the honors level through the use of criteria developed by each department. Criteria used will include student performance on standardized tests and locally prepared exams.

Distance Learning

Schalmont High School offers distance learning courses in French, Italian, Spanish Culture, sociology, psychology and sports history. The class format allows students to interact with teachers and students from other schools by way of TV monitors, video cameras and computers in the distance learning lab. Students are able to raise their hands to ask a teacher a question no matter where they are located. Schalmont is the provider of some courses and the recipient of others.

College in the High Schools (CHS)

The College in the High School program through Schenectady County Community College (SCCC) is set up to allow students to earn credits toward their college education while still in high school. Courses and teachers must be approved by the college. The courses at the high school are matched with the courses at the college to be sure that the same curriculum is taught. What the college covers in one semester, the high school will cover in two semesters. In order to earn credits for the course at SCCC, participants must receive a grade of at least a “C,” while a transfer to a four-year college may require at least a “B.”

By taking these courses in high school through the CHS Program, students:

  • Will pay about one third of the cost of taking the same course at the college, plus the books are provided at no charge.
  • Can reduce their college load by taking fewer credits during one or more of their college semesters.
  • Show college admissions officials that they are serious students.

For more information, contact Schalmont High School program coordinator Janet Cetnar at (518) 355-6110.

University in the High School: UAlbany

The University in the High School Program at the University at Albany provide students with the academic challenges of college-level curricula during their final year(s) of high school. Courses are regular offerings in the UAlbany catalog and are taught by carefully selected high school faculty. Once qualified, the high school faculty member becomes an adjunct professor through the UAlbany UHS program. UHS students who successfully complete the course will receive a UAlbany transcript for the college credits earned.

Syracuse University Project Advance (SUPA)

Syracuse University Project Advance (SUPA) is a cooperative program between Syracuse University and participating school districts that allows high school seniors to take regular college courses in their own schools at low cost.

The program enables students to rise to the challenge of college work through enrollment in introductory freshman-level courses prior to full-time college study. SUPA also serves other important purposes: it provides in-service training for high school instructors and a continuing forum for communication between educators from high school and university settings. As an agency of the University’s Center for Instructional Development, Project Advance conducts extensive ongoing research and evaluation as part of its efforts to improve instruction.

The courses are regular offerings in the schools and colleges of Syracuse University, and are taught by carefully selected high school faculty who are trained in special workshops by SU faculty members.

Grades for course work taken through Project Advance are earned in one or two semesters of class assignments and tests. As a result of their experience, Project Advance students earn a Syracuse University transcript for college credits successfully completed.

NCAA Eligibility 

The NCAA has strict academic eligibility requirements for prospective student-athletes to participate in Division I and II intercollegiate athletics. Students and parents should visit www.eligibilitycenter.org to review these requirements.

Determination of Class Rank

Class rank is calculated at the end of the first semester of grade 12. The student with the highest average of credits earned (courses completed) will be named valedictorian of the graduating class, and the student with the second highest average will be designated as salutatorian. There is no special weight given to any particular course or track level. Final grades in all subjects are counted except physical education semester courses. When a course is failed and later passed, the higher grade is given for passing the course with the higher average. Dropped/failed courses are given a value of 50.

College Planning

Students interested in attending a four-year college should plan to take at least three to four years of Regents math and Regents science, three years of a second language, and four years of Regents English and social studies.

Graduation Ceremony Participation

Only students who have met all graduation requirements, and are eligible for a high school diploma at the June graduation exercises will be permitted to participate in the graduation program. August or January graduates are not permitted to participate in June exercises.

Accelerated Graduation

Students who wish to complete their graduation requirements in less than four years must plan their program accordingly. The request to accelerate graduation should be made in writing, early in the high school program to the student’s guidance counselor and will need approval from the building principal.

Student Support Services

School counselors provide an organized program of counseling, instruction and consultation to all students, including: an annual review of each student’s progress, college and career guidance and planning, advisement and counseling services, and opportunities for parental involvement. A social worker and a school psychologist are also available to assist students and parents with issues that may interfere with a student’s education.

Special Education Services

Students with disabilities work toward attaining a Regents diploma, a local diploma, an IEP diploma, or, in some cases, a GED. Schalmont’s continuum of services enables them to be educated with non-disabled students to the maximum extent appropriate. This continuum is comprised of the provision of specially designed instruction and supplementary services in a variety of settings as determined appropriate by the Committee on Special Education. For more information, visit our special education page.

Transcripts

Transcripts are an official record of a student’s academic record as a high school student. Transcripts include all standardized test scores and will not be modified or changed. All scores from SAT and ACT will be reported, we cannot modify or eliminate any of the scores.

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ART

Art courses are available for students with an interest in majoring in art and those who desire to take one or two introductory courses in the field.

Studio in Art

Prerequisite – None 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 9-12
Studio in Art is a comprehensive, full-year course that includes art production (making art in various forms), art history, and art criticism. Students will explore techniques used in various forms of drawing, painting, sculpture, and design. This course may be used to satisfy the art/music requirement for graduating high school. This course must be completed before taking any other art elective.

Sculpture I

Prerequisite – Studio in Art 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 10-12
Students will explore three-dimensional art forms and work with a variety of media: clay, plaster, wood, metal, and stone. Students will learn to construct, mold, model and manipulate various materials into a completed art work. Artists of the past and present will be discussed as they relate to various projects.

Sculpture II/III

Prerequisite – Studio in Art, Sculpture I 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 11-12
Students in Sculpture II/III will explore more advanced techniques and materials related to three-dimensional art forms.

Digital Photography

Prerequisite – Studio in Art 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 11-12
Digital photography incorporates the fundamentals of film photography and the advancements of today’s technology. Students will learn the features of the camera, how to compose and shoot interesting photographs, and how to manipulate and edit photos using software. The course covers the history of photography, the different types of professional photography and highlights famous photographers who have made a significant contribution to photography.

College Drawing (3 college credits)

Prerequisite – Studio in Art 
½ Year – ½ Credit
Grades 11-12
College Drawing is a half year course that focuses on both the development of drawing skills and the understanding of drawing through time. The course follows the curriculum of SCCC’s Drawing 101 class. Upon successful completion, students will earn three college credits. The course requires students to develop a 12-piece portfolio and a written final critique of a drawing.

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Business Education

The Business Department is now offering a sequence for which students can earn an advanced Regents diploma in business. To complete the sequence, a student must take and pass Accounting I, Business Law, Principles of Marketing, Personal Finance, and Careers and Financial Management. University in the High School credits may be earned for some of these courses.

Accounting I (CHS) (4 college credits)

Prerequisite – None 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 10-12
Accounting is the language of business. Students planning to major in business or a related field in college, will need to learn to “speak the language.” This course will provide students with entry level job skills (bank teller, bookkeeper, accounting clerk etc.) as well as personal use skills such as maintaining and balancing a personal checkbook and debit card, understanding payroll procedures and preparing income tax returns. Students will learn accounting concepts and procedures by working through a complete accounting cycle for both a sole proprietorship service business and a corporation merchandising business.

Business Law

Prerequisite – None 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 11-12
The Business Law course will teach students about the criminal justice system and how it all began. Emphasis is on law as individuals may encounter it in business, occupational, or personal life. By studying true situations and cases, learn how business and personal law impacts the personal lives of young people and adults. Modules include ethics in law, tort or civil law, criminal law, the court system, personal injury law, insurance, contracts, real property, laws of minors, and family law. Mock trials will be conducted during this course.

Career and Financial Management

Prerequisite – None
 ½ Year – ½ Credit 
Grade 10
The Career and Financial Management course will enable students to explore a variety of careers and learn critical skills to be career and college ready after high school. Students will utilize the guidance program Naviance to explore different career options and identify the training, skills and post-secondary education that will be required to be successful in that field. Additionally students will explore independent financial management to learn to efficiently handle personal finance and consumption expenditures.

Personal Finance

Prerequisite – None 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 11-12
The Personal Finance course will provide students with the background and attitudes essential for making good financial decisions both now and in the future. The course begins with a unit on financial planning, including budgeting, and career planning. Information on banking, credit cards, checking accounts, investing, income taxes, insurance, and understanding paycheck deductions will be covered. A project will be done on purchasing an automobile, funding college, and renting an apartment. The class will participate in the “stockmarket game,” competing with students from schools across the country.

Principles of Marketing (CHS) (3 college credits) 

Prerequisite – None 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 10-12
This course introduces students to the important role that marketing plays in our economic system. Content revolves around the basic marketing function. Selling, promotion, pricing, purchasing, product, service, idea planning, and distribution are covered. Projects are developed to give students hands-on experience using these functions. Students will “create” their own products, design a radio commercial, logos, slogans and jingles as well as create a television commercial.

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Engineering

Project Lead the Way I: Introduction to Engineering Design

Prerequisite – None 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grade 9
This course teaches problem-solving skills using a design development process. Models of product solutions are created, analyzed, and communicated using solid modeling computer design software. In New York State, Circuit Test the course is called Design and Drawing for Production and follows the syllabus developed by the State Education Department. (Software used – AutoDesk Inventor)

Project Lead the Way II: Principles of Engineering

Prerequisite – PLTW I 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grade 10
This is a survey course of engineering, exposing students to some of the major concepts they will encounter in a postsecondary engineering course of study. Students will be provided with the opportunity to develop their skills and understanding of course concepts through activity-, project-, and problem-based learning. Topics of study include mechanisms, energy sources, energy applications, machine control, fluid power, statics, material properties, material testing, statistics and kinematics.

Project Lead the Way III: Digital Electronics

Prerequisite – PLTW II 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grade 11
This is a course in applied logic that encompasses the application of electronic circuits and devices. Computer simulation software is used to design and test digital circuitry prior to the actual construction of circuits and devices. (Software used – MultiSim)

Project Lead the Way IV: Civil Engineering and Architecture

Prerequisite – PLTW III 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grade 12
This course studies the design and construction of residential and commercial building projects. It provides students with an introduction to many of the factors involved in building design and construction, including building components and systems, structural design, storm water management, site design, utilities and services, cost estimation, energy efficiency, and careers in the design and construction industry.

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English

Students must take four years of English as a requirement for graduation. The English Department plans each course to help meet the objectives of a positive language arts curriculum that stresses the four elements of reading, writing, listening, and speaking.

English 9, 10, and 11

Prerequisite – English for previous grade year
3 Years – 3 Credits
Grades 9-11
Students in English 9-11 study various literary genres (fiction, non-fiction, drama, poetry), build vocabulary, practice research techniques and literary criticism, and develop writing skills with a focus on specific qualities for assessment. These are full-year courses that focus on the development of skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. All of these courses address the New York State Standards and the Common Core Learning Standards and help to prepare students to take the Common Core English Regents exam in their junior year. Students must pass this exam for high school graduation.

English 10 (H)

Prerequisite – ELA 8 scores, English 9, teacher recommendation, completion of essay placement test and summer reading assignment
Year – 1 Credit
Grade 10
This course requires rigorous reading, both over the summer and during the school year. It begins at the conclusion of the freshman year. Students will read, analyze, and interpret significant literature from a number of time periods and genres. The emphasis is on critical reading and writing, and students are expected to accept considerable responsibility for completion of the many reading, writing, and research projects. Students who earn a final course average of an 88 or higher and receive the teacher’s recommendation will be enrolled in English 11 AP.

English Literature and Composition (AP)

Prerequisite – 85+ on NYS English Regents exam, 88+ average in English 10 (H), teacher recommendation, completion of summer reading assignment
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grade 11
Qualified students can elect to take English Literature and Composition (AP) in their junior year, which gives them the opportunity to complete college level work while in high school. The course requires rigorous reading during the school year, which begins at the end of the sophomore year when the summer reading assignment is given. Students will read, analyze and interpret significant literature from a number of time periods and genres with an emphasis on continued critical reading, thinking, and writing. Students are expected to accept considerable responsibility for completion of many reading and writing tasks. Course participants are mandated to sit for the AP exam in Literature and Composition (fee required) in May of their junior year and the NYS Common Core English Regents in June. Those who complete the English (AP) course are given first preference for enrollment in Syracuse University Project Advance (SUPA) courses for their senior year.

English 12

Prerequisite – English 9-11 or English 9 and English Honors/AP 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grade 12
English 12 prepares students both for college and for life. In this course, students will read some of the most studied literature of our language, discover how films can challenge and even shape our beliefs, investigate the ever-changing world of music and poetry, examine various forms of literary and film criticism, analyze short stories about people of all backgrounds, and engage in the stimulating process of research. Students will learn to embrace the tapestry that is our society as seen through the many experiences and cultures of our world. Students will study works by both traditional and contemporary authors and directors. In the first several weeks of the course, all seniors will complete a senior folder, including an updated resume and activity sheet, an autobiographical sketch, and a practice college essay, all of which will be necessary for college applications in December.

English 12 (SUPA) (6  college credits)

Prerequisite – English 9-11 or English 9 and English Honors/AP, 85 or higher on English Regents exam, recommendation of teacher
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grade 12
Instead of enrolling in English 12, qualified students can elect to take college-level English through the Syracuse University Project Advance (SUPA) courses. Two one-semester courses make up the English offering for Project Advance. Minimal requirements: students should have passed the English Regents exam with at least an 85 and have a “B” average or higher in English and the recommendation of their teacher. In addition, students who have completed the English Honors/AP two-year sequence will be given first preference for enrollment. The Project Advance courses require a tuition payment set by Syracuse University, which awards course credit for those students earning a minimum of a “C” grade for the course. Students who complete the course satisfactorily are often exempted from college English requirements; more than 600 colleges and universities accept Project Advance credits.

English 12 (SUPA): Writing Studio I

Writing Studio 1 (WRT 105) is the first of two English courses offered through the Writing Program at Syracuse University. It is required of all students in one semester of their freshman year. Studio 1 pays particular attention to writing formal academic persuasive papers. Students confer with the teacher on an individual basis, revise frequently, and read from a variety of texts.
English 12 (SUPA): English and Textual Studies — Class & Literary Texts
The English and Textual Studies: Class & Literary Texts (ETS 181) course presents students with many different forms of reading and makes students aware that their understanding and appreciation of what they read may vary from culture to culture, from time period to time period, and depend upon issues connected to socio-economic class. The focus of the course is on literary theory set in an historical framework. Concepts such as social stratification, inequality, and the relationship among wealth, privilege, and power provide critical lenses through which to interpret texts and foster a richer understanding of students’ own implications within these systems of power and even perhaps to act as a springboard for advocacy and direct social action.

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Art Electives

Explorations of Dystopia in Film and Literature (DL) 

Prerequisite: none 
½ Year – ½ Credit
Grades 11-12
This course explores the place of the individual in dystopian societies as they are depicted in print and on film. Through our analysis of films such as The Matrix, Blade Runner, Mad Max, Minority Report and Metropolis and texts such as Anthem by Ayn Rand, The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood, Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro, as well as various short stories, we will explore the impacts such societies have on the individual’s freedom, motivation and spirit. Open to juniors and seniors. This course would be taken in addition to English 11 or 12.

Creative Non-Fiction (DL)

Prerequisite: none 
½ Year – ½ Credit
Grades 11-12
Writing is one of the most powerful tools individuals have in our arsenal of communication tools. It allows us to evoke emotion, persuade, inform and entertain, sometimes all within the same piece of writing. Throughout this course, we will explore other writers’ works in the genres of memoir, argument and the personal essay and use them as springboards to inspire our own writings. This course is open to juniors and seniors. This course would be taken in addition to English 11 or 12.

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Family and Consumer Science

The mission of the Family and Consumer Science Department is to help students become competent, self-reliant, confident and caring individuals while managing their personal lives, family and careers.

Chef’s Class

Prerequisite – None 
½ Year – ½ Credit
Grade 10
This is a beginning-level cooking class for students who either wish to pursue careers in the food industry as nutritionists, dieticians, or chefs, or just want to learn how to cook for themselves.

Advanced Chef’s Class

Prerequisite – None 
½ Year – ½ Credit 
Grade 11
This course is filled with competition and challenges for the serious or very interested young chef. Using today’s food interests and some of TV’s game show-like style, student’s learn to improve their cooking skills and widen their food interests.

Child Development

Prerequisite – None 
½ Year – ½ Credit
Grade 11
This course is recommended for students interested in careers in education, nursing, counseling, or human services. Baby simulators are used as a class project and provide a challenging “parenting” experience. The course studies children’s growth and development from birth through adolescence.

Child Psychology

Prerequisite – None
 ½ Year – ½ Credit
Grade 11
Topics of discussion and research include learning disabilities, intelligence, attachment and bonding, social and emotional development of children from birth through adolescence. Students also study leading theories in the field of child psychology.

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Health

Health

Prerequisite – None 
½ Year – ½ Credit
Grades 10-12
This required course is designed to cover the critical areas of health. The topics covered include, but are not limited to: nutrition, alcohol, tobacco and other drugs, relationships, non-communicable and communicable diseases, human sexuality, injury prevention, stress management, and mental health. The course focuses on the consequences of harmful behaviors that relate to young adults.

Health Electives

Human Sexuality

Prerequisite – Health 
½ Year – ½ Credit
Grade 12
This course will focus on the following topics: character in relationships, dating and abstinence, violent relationships, reproductive health, STDs and HIV/AIDS, marriage and parenthood, pregnancy and childbirth, and birth control methods. The course emphasizes the use of refusal skills, making responsible decisions, and practicing abstinence as ways to reduce teen pregnancies and exposure to STDs.

Nutrition – Weight Management

Prerequisite – Health 
½ Year – ½ Credit
Grade 12
This course will focus on the following topics: physical activity for life, nutrition and your health, and managing weight and body composition. It also focuses on the importance of maintaining a healthy weight in order to reduce the probability of developing heart disease, cancer, and adult-onset diabetes.

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Literacy

With the adoption of the common Core Standards, literacy is stressed in all disciplines to support students in all departments in the area of literacy skill. Our literacy department was created to provide students with the necessary skills in this area. 

English AIS (Academic Intervention Services)

Prerequisite – previous grade year
English for 3 Years 
Grades 9-11
Students are recommended to take this class based on previous scores on the 8th grade ELA exam, teacher recommendations and class scores in high school ELA. This class will provide students with the literacy support needed in all content classrooms as well as the skills needed to successfully complete the English Common Core Regents.

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Mathematics

Algebra I

Prerequisite – 85+ average and 3 or 4 on NYS Assessment in 8th Grade Math, teacher recommendation
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grade 9
This course will be based on the Algebra 1 Common Core learning standards adopted by NY state. The course focuses on the relationships between quantities and reasoning with equations; descriptive statistics; linear and exponential relationships; expressions and equations; quadratic functions, expressions. The TI-84 or TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition calculator is required for this course. A Regents exam will be taken in June.

Algebra I – Part 2

Prerequisite – 8th Grade Mathematics, teacher recommendation, 1 or 2 on NYS Assessment in 8th Grade Math 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grade 9
This is the first year of a two-year algebra course leading to the Algebra Regents. Part of the curriculum is dedicated to strengthening students’ foundational skills. This course will follow half of the Algebra 1 Common Core Learning standards adopted by NY state. The TI-84 or TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition calculator is required for this course. A final is taken at the end of the course in June.

Algebra I – Part 2

Prerequisite – Algebra 1 – Part 1
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grade 10
This is the second year of a two-year algebra course leading to the Algebra Regents. This course will finish the Algebra 1 Common Core Learning standards adopted by NY state. The TI-84 or TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition calculator is required for this course. A Regents exam will be taken in June.

Geometry

Prerequisite – Algebra 1 or Algebra 1-Part 2 Requires 80%+ on Algebra 1 Regents exam on Algebra 1 Regents exam, teacher recommendation 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 10/11
This course will focus on the fundamental concepts of the Geometry Common Core learning standards adopted by NY state. The course will focus on the congruence, similarity, construction, transformation and proof of figures; trigonometric ratios; three-dimensional figures; connecting algebra and geometry through coordinates; circles with and without coordinates. The TI-84 or TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition calculator is required for this course. A Regents exam will be taken in June.

Geometry Honors

Prerequisite – Algebra 1 (93%+ average), requires 80%+ on Algebra 1 Regents exam,  teacher recommendation 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grade 9
This course is designed for accelerated students. This course will be based on the Geometry Common Core learning standards adopted by NY state. The course will focus on the congruence, similarity, construction, transformation and proof of figures; trigonometric ratios; three-dimensional figures; connecting algebra and geometry through coordinates; circles with and without coordinates. The TI-84 or TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition calculator is required for this course. A Regents exam will be taken in June.

Applied Geometry

Prerequisite – Algebra 1 or Algebra 1-Part 2, Passing grade on Algebra 1 Regents exam, Teacher recommendation
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grade 10/11
This course will be based on the Geometry Common Core learning standards adopted by NY state. It is designed for students who need more instructional time to meet these standards. The course will focus on the congruence, similarity, construction, transformation and proof of figures; Trigonometric ratios; three-dimensional figures; connecting algebra and geometry through coordinates; Circles with and without coordinates. The TI-84 or TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition calculator is required for this course. A final exam will be taken in June.

Algebra II Honors

Prerequisite – 93+ Geometry average 80+ on Geometry Regents exam, teacher recommendation
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grade 10
This is the third course in the three-year Regents sequence designed for accelerated students. The course is based on the Algebra2 Common Core learning standards adopted by NY state. The course will focus on polynomial, rational, and radical relationships; trigonometry; exponential and logarithmic functions; probability and statistics. The TI-84 or TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition calculator is required for this course. A Regents will be taken in June.

Algebra II

Prerequisite – Geometry 80+ Geometry Regents exam, teacher recommendation
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grade 11
This is the third course in the three-year Regents sequence based on the Algebra 2 Common Core learning standards adopted by NY state. The course will focus on polynomial, rational, and radical relationships; trigonometry; exponential and logarithmic functions; probability and statistics. The TI-84 or TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition calculator is required for this course. A Regents will be taken in June.

Algebra II Part 1

Prerequisite- Geometry or Applied Geometry. 
1 year -1 credit
Grade 11/12
This course will be based on the Algebra 2 Common Core learning standards adopted by NY state. It is designed for students who need more instructional time to meet these standards. The course will focus on polynomial, rational, and radical relationships: introduction to relations and functions; quadratics; complex numbers. The TI-84 or TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition calculator is required for this course. A final exam will be taken in June

Algebra II Part 2

Prerequisite – Algebra 2 Part 1
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grade 11/12
This course will be based on the Algebra 2 Common Core learning standards adopted by NY state. It is a continuation of the Algebra 2-Part 1 course. The course will focus on trigonometry; exponential and logarithmic functions; probability and statistics; as well as continue to review the topics in Algebra II-Part1. The TI-84 or TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition calculator is required for this course. A Regents will be taken in June.

Pre-Calculus (CHS) (4 college credits)

Prerequisite – 85+ average in 1 Algebra 2, teacher recommendation
Year – 1 Credit
Grade 12
This course prepares students for a basic level calculus course in college. Topics include analytic geometry, advanced algebra and trigonometry, polynomial functions, conic sections, and graphing polar equations. The graphing calculator is used extensively. This class is currently being offered from SCCC (MAT 167). Students take a local final exam in June.

Pre-Calculus (H) (CHS) (4 college credits)

Prerequisite – 85+ average in Algebra 2 and 80+ on Algebra 2 Regents exam, teacher recommendation 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grade 11
This course is the prerequisite for those students planning on taking AP Calculus in their senior year. Topics include analytic geometry, advanced algebra, matrix algebra, techniques of graphing, transcendental and algebraic functions, advanced trigonometry, limits and an introduction to calculus. This class is currently being offered from SCCC (MAT 167). Students take a local final exam in June.

Calculus (AP)

Prerequisite – 92+ average in Pre-Calculus (H), teacher recommendation 
1 Year – 1 Credit 
Grade 12
This course includes all topics from the AP Calculus course and selected topics from the BC course published by the College Entrance Exam Board. Students take the Advanced Placement Exam in May. Many students receive college credit after their chosen college evaluates their scores. Topics include derivatives and integrals of polynomials; algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and limits. Application problems include graphing, velocity, acceleration, related rates, maximum and minimum values, mean value, areas, volumes, growth and decay and work. After the exam in May, students study topics from advanced integration.

Calculus 1 (CHS) (4 college credits)

Prerequisite – Pre-Calculus (H), teacher recommendation 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grade 12
This course, in the calculus of a single variable, includes limits, continuity, derivatives of algebraic and transcendental functions, implicit differentiation, related rates, the Mean Value Theorem, antiderivatives, definite integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. The course introduces applications of differentiation such as curve sketching and optimization problems as well as applications of integration such as area and average value. This course is currently being offered from SCCC(MAT180). Students take a local final exam in June.

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Music

The Schalmont High School Music Department offers students an opportunity for a well-rounded, useful music education. The department strives to develop musical excellence through a three-fold progression. The music program includes the teaching and development of technical music skills, the appreciation of all types of music literature, and individual performing experiences through participation in musical organizations. All students enrolled in music performance courses must adhere to the department attendance policy as stated in the Student Handbook. Performing groups can meet the Regents Action Plan requirements in the art of music.

Concert Band

Prerequisite – Previous Band Experience 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 9-12
This course will involve the study, preparation and performance of music in the band repertoire. Students will be required to spend additional outside school time in preparation for this course. All students will be required to take a weekly instruction period in school or with an approved private music instructor outside of school. Also, students will be required to adhere to the music policy given to each student at the beginning of each year. The course meets daily for one period.

Wind Ensemble

Prerequisite – By Audition Only Level H,R
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 10-12
Students will perform music more challenging than concert band. This will be a select ensemble numbering no more than 45 students. Requirements for credit are the same as Concert Band.

Marching Band

Prerequisite – Students in Band Proper must be enrolled in Concert Level H,R,S Band or Wind Ensemble 
1 Year – 0 Credit
Grades 9-12
Marching Band consists of the following units: flags, the auxiliary unit, and the band proper. The auxiliary unit will be enrolled in this course by try-outs held the previous spring. An audition may be required of students in the Band Proper to meet the needs and limitations imposed by instrumentation. Outside preparation and intense weekly drills are required for this course. The course will meet weekly, in the evening, for a period of two and one-half hours, from September to the end of the year. Participation in all events, as outlined in the attendance policy, is expected.

Jazz Ensemble

Prerequisite – Be enrolled in Concert Band or Wind Ensemble and successfully complete a separate audition if necessary
1 Year – 0 Credit 
Grades 9 – 12
This course will involve the study, preparation, and performance of jazz repertoire. The music to be studied will be taken from all periods of jazz, which will enable the student to become acquainted with different forms and sounds of jazz. Students will be required to prepare outside of school for the course, and must demonstrate continued progress in order to remain in the course. The course will meet weekly, after school hours, for one hour, from September to the end of the year.

Chorus

Prerequisite – None 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 9-12
This course will engage students in the study, preparation, and performance of music in the choral repertoire. The objective of chorus is the development of strong singing skills, as well as the ability to become a good music reader and musician. Rehearsals consist of instruction in individual and group voice production, interpretation of all musical selections, and the study of pertinent music theory applications. Many different styles of music are studied and performed, culminating in three evening performances and several extracurricular concerts that are scheduled throughout the school year. Participation fosters interpersonal group skills, camaraderie, and the joy of singing with others.

Concert Choir

Prerequisite – By audition only 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 10-12
Students in Chorus may audition at the end of each school year for a position in this select choir. Students accepted must demonstrate exceptional musical abilities and knowledge, and possess a strong work ethic. Repertoire selected in this performing group is of a higher caliber than Chorus, and requires students who are willing to strive for a higher level of excellence. All students will be required to take a weekly vocal lesson in school or may study privately on a weekly basis with an approved private music instructor. Students participating in this group are eligible to apply for positions in exciting extracurricular choir opportunities, such as the Melodies of Christmas Choir, Area All-State Choir, and All-State Choir.

Music Theory (UHS – UAlbany) (3 college credits)

Prerequisite – None 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 10-12
This course is designed to help students master all of the essential aspects of music. Course content includes the study of the following: rhythm, pitch, key signatures, scales, intervals, chords, melody, and harmony. At the completion of this class, students will be able to “dissect” musical compositions as well as learn strategies that will assist them in writing their own music. Also included in this class is a brief overview of music history, beginning in the Middle Ages and proceeding through the 19th century. No previous musical background or talent is necessary for the completion of this class. This class is recommended for students who are interested in pursuing a career in music, anticipate taking music classes in college, or simply enjoy listening to or performing music.

History of Rock Music

Prerequisite – None 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 9-12
This class will cover the history of rock music from the 1950s to the early 1970s. After a brief foundational study of the ‘20s, ‘30s and ‘40s, we will proceed into the explosive sound of rock music beginning with Elvis Presley and rockabilly. We’ll look at the British Invasion, as the Beatles, the Who, and the Rolling Stones invade America in the ‘60s… the bands that performed at Woodstock as the hippie movement stormed from coast to coast… and rock that pushed the boundaries, like the Jimi Hendrix Experience. This class is designed for students who are seriously interested in understanding music that has changed the world. There will be in-depth discussions of the bands that created it and the historical perspectives that will help make sense of it as it unfolds across the nation. This is a class for those who have a love of music and want to delve deeper into the intricacies of some of the greatest music ever written.

History of Rock Music II & III

Prerequisite – History of Rock Music I 1 
Year – 1 Credit 
Recommended Grades 10-12
This class is designed for students who have a love of music and want to delve deeper into the intricacies of some of the greatest music ever written. There will be in-depth discussions, historical perspectives and a live component that will allow students to discover the art of sound and light engineering. The class may even put on a live rock show!

History of Rock II will cover the history of rock music from the 1970s-1980s. Study begins with Woodstock then “break on through to the other side” with the Doors and Rolling Stones; hit one of rock’s most influential bands, Led Zeppelin; delve deeper into the origins of metal with Deep Purple, Black Sabbath, and Rainbow; head south for the sounds of the Allman Brothers, Lynyrd Skynyrd and ZZ Top; crank it up with Grand Funk and Aerosmith; dive into the mainstream sound of Boston and Foreigner; rock out with Van Halen; delve into Rush and Kansas, plus others.

History of Rock III will cover the history of rock music from the 1970s-1990s. Study begins with AC/DC; moves into progressive rock with Emerson, Lake, and Palmer, Yes, and Pink Floyd; the glam rock of David Bowie, Alice Cooper, and Kiss; the British heavy metal of Judas Priest, Iron Maiden, and Def Leppard; the theater rock of Queen; the Seattle sound of Nirvana, Soundgarden and more.

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Physical Education

All high school students are required by the New York State Education Department to take physical education. The course is offered every other day.

Physical Education 9, 10
Prerequisite – None 
1 Year – ½ Credit
Grades 9-10
Freshman/Sophomore physical education includes instruction in life time activities, team and individual sports. Specific activities include but are not limited to: ultimate Frisbee, soccer, football, volleyball, basketball, badminton, pickleball, team handball, tennis, fitness and a variety of novelty games.

Physical Education 11, 12
Prerequisite – Physical Education 9,10 
1 Year – ½ Credit
Grades 11-12
Junior/Senior physical education includes activities that are offered in the 9-10 program and also a fitness/walking program. Students are able to choose from to physical fitness, life time activities, team and individual sports and cooperative games daily.

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Science

The following courses have a separate lab that meets two days out of the four-day cycle:

  • Physical Setting/Earth Science
  • Living Environment
  • Living Environment Honors
  • Physical Setting/Chemistry
  • Physical Setting/Chemistry Honors
  • Physical Setting/Physics

Physical Setting/Earth Science

Prerequisite – None 1 
Year – 1 Credit
Grade 9
This course is an inquiry-based investigation of planet Earth. It includes the study of geology, meteorology, astronomy, oceanography and environmental awareness. The course involves not only the understanding of concepts, but also the process of science and the use of tools for gathering and analyzing scientific information. The laboratory component is an integral part of this course. Students will use mathematical analysis, scientific inquiry, and engineering design as appropriate, to pose questions, seek answers and develop solutions. This is a Regents level course that fulfills one year of the required three years of science needed for graduation.

Physical Setting/Earth Science Lab

This laboratory class must be taken by all students enrolled in Earth Science even if the student is repeating the course. The course meets every other day and is scheduled in addition to the lecture part of the course. Students must successfully complete the equivalent of 30 laboratory exercises in order to take the New York State Regents exam in Earth Science. The grade for this part of the course is averaged into the quarter grade for Earth Science.

Living Environment

Prerequisite – None 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grade 10
Living Environment is a mandatory course that all students must pass in order to graduate. It focuses on understanding and mastery of scientific concepts, principles, and theories pertaining to the living environment and recognizing the historical development of ideas in biological science. The key topics discussed are: unity and diversity among living things and their interactions with the environment, genetics, evolution, reproduction and development, equilibrium and ecology. The laboratory component is an integral part of the course and is scheduled in addition to the lecture.

Living Environment (H)

Prerequisite – Physical Setting/Earth Science Final average of 92% or higher, and 90% or above on mid-term and Regents 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grade 10
The honors program is an enrichment of the living environment course. Each unit that this taught goes in depth and at a faster pace. Students will take the NYS Regents Exam in Living Environment.

Living Environment Lab

Lab is required for all students taking the Living Environment course. Any pupil enrolled in this program must complete the lab requirements. The students will use mathematical analysis, scientific inquiry, and engineering and design to pose questions, seek answers and develop solutions. The student is required to satisfactorily complete a minimum of 30 laboratory experiments, four of which are mandated by New York State in order to take the NYS Regents exam in Living Environment. The grade for the laboratory part of the course will be averaged into the quarter class grade.

Physical Setting/Chemistry

Prerequisite – Living Environment. Integrated Algebra
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 11-12
Chemistry is strongly recommended for any college-bound student. 
The Physical Setting/Chemistry course is designed to provide students with a solid understanding of the nature of matter and its interactions, which underlie all other scientific disciplines and prepares students to undertake more advanced study in these fields. In addition, students will use mathematical analysis, scientific inquiry, problem solving, and research in order to understand and apply the themes that connect mathematics, science, and technology and to solve real-life problems. The core topics are: atomic structure; the periodic table; moles and stoichiometry; chemical bonding; physical behavior of matter; kinetics and equilibrium; organic chemistry; oxidation-reduction; acids, bases, and salts; nuclear chemistry; chemical laboratory skills. Students will take the New York State Regents Chemistry exam.

Physical Setting/Chemistry (H)

Prerequisite – Living Environment, Integrated Algebra, Final average of 92% or higher Grade 10 and 90% or above in the Living Environment midterm exam and Regents
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 11-12
The honors program is an enrichment of the chemistry course. Each unit that is taught goes in depth and at a faster pace.

Physical Setting/Chemistry Lab

Laboratory investigations explain science as a process of inquiry and investigation to explain natural phenomenon, providing guidelines and methods for designing and conducting experiments. The student must successfully complete 30 lab exercises to qualify for the New York State Regents exam in Chemistry. The grade for the lab part of the course will be averaged into the quarter class grade.

Physical Setting/Physics

Prerequisite – Living Environment, completed Geometry or above 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 11-12
Physics is the study of the basic nature of the world around us and is the foundation of modern science and technology. Physics is strongly recommended for any college-bound student. The main focus of the course is the development of conceptual understanding of basic concepts of physics as well as problem-solving skills. The five main topics are mechanics, energy, wave phenomena, electricity and magnetism, and modern physics. The course uses basic algebra and involves experiments, projects and formulas that explain the basic laws of the physical world. Physics will give students an essential foundation for real understanding in later study of engineering, professional sciences, technical training, medical and health-related fields, engineering, architecture, math, electronics and computer science. The course demonstrates the connection of physics to the real world while emphasizing the application of physics principles. There is a mandatory lab requirement and Regents exam.

Physical Setting/Physics Lab

The lab component is an integral part of the Physical Setting/Physics course, incorporating analysis, inquiry design, engineering design, and information systems. Physics lab is required for all students taking Regents Physics. Any pupil enrolled in the course must complete the lab requirements. Students are required to complete a minimum of 1,200 minutes of laboratory experiences with successfully completed reports in order to qualify for the New York State Regents exam in June.

Science Electives

Applied Chemistry

Prerequisite – Living Environment, Earth Science, Passed one Science Regents exam 
1 Year – 1 Credit 
Grades 11-12
This is an activity-based course that provides students with an introduction to the major concepts in chemistry and their application to our daily lives. Students will engage in scientific inquiry and practice the rules of safety required in a chemistry lab. The course focuses on the classification and structure of matter, the history of chemistry, the use of models, and experimental design. Topics vary based on student interest, but may include: separation techniques, types of chemical reactions, acids and bases, and the chemistry of food, industry, and the environment. While not as comprehensive or rigorous as Regents Chemistry, it is a college preparatory course for non-science majors. This course can also be taken before a student enters Regents Chemistry as an introduction to the major concepts of chemistry.

Astronomy

Prerequisite – Living Environment, Earth Science, Passed one science Regents 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 11-12
This is a project-based, hands-on approach to the study of the Universe. Students will use various computer programs and websites for course study. Topics include the sun and stars, planets and moons, extrasolar planets, black holes, galaxies, the formation of the universe and the history of space exploration. Students will be required to give oral presentations on their research.

Environmental Studies

Prerequisite – Earth Science, Living Environment, Passed one science Regents
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 11-12
This course is designed as a project based/hands-on approach to environmental science dealing with issues such as: fresh water quality analysis, energy uses and alternative energy, climate change, natural resource management, environmental policy and legislation, biodiversity, ecology, and human impacts.

Forensic Science

Prerequisite – Earth Science, Living Environment, Passed one science Regents 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 11-12
This course is an introduction to the science of solving crimes. It will introduce students to what evidence is, how it is collected, and the scientific foundation for the examination of physical, chemical, and biological items of evidence. Topics of study include fingerprints, blood spatter, toxicology, DNA, skeletal remains, hair and textiles, arson, bite-marks, tool-marks, glass and soil analyses. Students will participate in hands-on activities and labs as well as research and discuss forensic careers. Area professionals are invited to share their experiences. Students may take another science course concurrently in addition to this elective during their high school career.

Human Biology (CHS – SCCC) (4 college credits)

Prerequisite – Regents Chemistry,  Physics (seniors may take concurrently with this course) 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 11-12
In Human Biology, the primary emphasis is placed on the anatomy and physiology of the human body systems. Diseases are studied from malfunction perspective, the environment and heredity. Lab exercises include the use of anatomical models and videos to study anatomy, and microscopes to study cell and tissue structure. Dissections, chemical analyses and independent work are part of the lab experience. Other topics include comparative anatomy, nutrition, DNA technologies, fetal development and injuries. Students who are interested in a health-related career are strongly encouraged to enroll.

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Second Languages

The second language program is offered in grades 9-12. We strive toward the following goals:

  1. Keep the second language alive by using it in the classroom
  2. Teach students to understand, speak, read and write a second language
  3. Encourage students to continue the study of a second language long enough to attain proficiency in the four skills.
  4. Promote an understanding and appreciation of the value system and behavior patterns of the people whose language students are studying.

Students pursuing an Advanced Regents diploma must take three years of a language and pass the comprehensive department examination for the language.

Second language training is advisable for the student who might want to attend a two- or four-year college, receive vocational or technical training, or develop skills which will enhance his/her life experiences through travel, communications, or knowledge of other cultures.

French Level I

Prerequisite – None 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 9-12
Basic dialogues and patterns of French are drilled to develop a degree of fluency and a mastery of basic grammatical concepts. Elementary reading and writing are introduced. Cultural aspects of the language and French-speaking people are explored. Special emphasis is placed on listening comprehension and conversational skills.

French Level II

Prerequisite – French I
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 9-12
In French Level II, the student will acquire skills to speak and to understand simple conversations dealing with general topics. Time will be devoted to dialogues and exercises that will increase the student’s ability to communicate and to understand the spoken and written language. Knowledge of structure will increase as the year progresses. Field trips, cultural events, and audiovisual aids contribute to a better appreciation of the areas studied.

French Level III

Prerequisite – French II 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 10-12
In French Level III, the student is able to speak ideas with minimal help from the teacher as the year progresses. Reading will involve passages in the text and supplementary materials, including a brief review of French culture and history.

French Level IV/V (DL) (CHS) (3 college credits)

Prerequisite – Comprehensive exam in French (optional), permission of instructor
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grade 11
In French Level IV/V, the primary emphasis is on grammar review, readings, contemporary French civilizations, writing, and conversation. Readings will include short stories, plays, newspaper and magazine articles, and one full-length work. This course is designed to give students an opportunity to earn college credit in French. Successful completion of the course will render three college credits at SCCC.

Italian (DL)

Prerequisite – Continuing current sequence of upper-level language study
1 Year – 1 Credit  
Grade 12
The purpose of this course is to develop basic communication skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing Italian, and to provide students with an introduction to the long, rich culture of Italy. Students will be using a variety of media, such as music, videos, magazines, newspapers, games, the Internet and text materials. Class participation is a must. Oral communication in Italian is essential to learning the language. Benvenuti in Italiano.

Spanish Culture

Prerequisite – Teacher/counselor recommendation 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 9-12
This course is open to students who have been selected through the cooperation of their teacher and guidance counselor as either struggling or unable to achieve the minimum requirements for completion of their one credit of high school foreign language, and will not be continuing in a foreign language sequence for an Advanced Regents diploma. This student may not progress to Level II Spanish without taking and passing the traditional Level I Spanish class.

Spanish Level I

Prerequisite – None 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 9-12
In Spanish Level I, basic dialogues and patterns of Spanish are drilled to develop a degree of fluency and a mastery of basic grammatical concepts. Elementary reading and writing are introduced. Cultural aspects of the language and Spanish-speaking peoples are explored. Special emphasis is placed on listening comprehension and conversational skills.

Spanish Level II

Prerequisite – Spanish I 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 9-12
Emphasis is placed on an audio-lingual approach to develop language skills. Longer reading passages are introduced. More writing is emphasized by answering questions related to reading passages and free questions based on vocabulary dealing with school, family, sports etc. There is a review of basic grammar structures and an introduction to more complex grammar patterns with a continued study of cultural concerns via use of slides, Internet, DVDs and videos.

Spanish Level III

Prerequisite – Spanish II 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 10-12
In Spanish Level III, the course consists of mastering all language skills with an emphasis on auditory and reading comprehension. A review of all grammatical structures with liberated writing in guided composition work and visual and auditory dialogue is also included. There will be continued study of cultural material dialogue in the foreign language.

Spanish Level IV (UHS – UAlbany) (4 college credits)

Prerequisite – Comprehensive department exam in Spanish, permission of instructor
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grade 11
Students’ ability to communicate in and comprehend Spanish will develop along with their knowledge of the language’s vocabulary and grammatical structures. Mastery of these skills will be enhanced through cultural awareness. This course is designed to give students an opportunity to earn college credit at UAlbany, which can be transferred to other colleges.

Spanish Level V (UHS – UAlbany) (4 college credits)

Prerequisite – Spanish IV, teacher recommendation 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grade 12
The primary emphasis of the course is placed on readings, short compositions and class discussions. Students will use the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing in Spanish, and gain knowledge of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. They will also develop insight into the nature of language and culture through comparison. Videos will be used as part of instruction. Successful completion of the course will render college credits at UAlbany, which can be transferred to other colleges.

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Social Studies

Upon completion of the social studies program, the successful student will be able to demonstrate the ability to make rational and informed decisions about economic, social, and political questions confronting himself or herself, the society, and the interdependent world. Such decisions will draw upon the lessons of history and the social sciences.

Social Studies 9/10 – Global History I, II

Prerequisite – Social Studies for previous grade year
2 Years – 2 Credits
Grades 9-10
The New York State Regents exam, which is given at the end of 10th grade encompasses two years’ work. It requires students to have some mastery over the five social studies standards, common themes that recur across time and place, and eight historical eras. Students should also have a general knowledge of the similarities and differences of the people and events across political boundaries and time.

Social Studies 11 – U.S. History

Prerequisite – Social Studies 9/10 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grade 11
The New York State Regents exam, which is given at the end of 11th grade will require that all students have some mastery and understanding of the basic structure, function, and operation of the American government. Students should also have a good knowledge and values base rooted in historical tradition as well as contemporaneous society.

Social Studies 11 – U.S. History (AP)

Prerequisite – 90+ average in Social Studies 9/10 and teacher recommendation
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grade 11
This college-level course is designed to provide students with the analytic and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and material in U.S. history. Students will use analytical skills, along with research and argument to critically evaluate the facts and problems in U.S. history. The course prepares students for college courses by making demands upon them that are equivalent to those made by a full-year introductory college course. Students are expected to not merely recall historical facts, but to also assess their relevance, their reliability, and their importance to historical problems in U.S. history. Through both written and oral communication, students will make conclusions based on informed judgments. These conclusions should be clearly and persuasively presented throughout the school year.

Social Studies AIS Lab

Prerequisite – Placement based on Global History grade and performance on Global History or U.S. History Regents exams
1 Year – No Credit
Grade 11
The purpose of this lab is to focus on the content and skills needed for students to successfully complete either the Global History or U.S. History Regents exam requirements. Multiple measures will be used to determine which students are recommended for social studies AIS lab. As part of the state mandated Academic Intervention Services program, 11th grade students who fail the Global History Regents or 12th grade students who fail the U.S. History Regents will also be placed in this lab until they successfully complete the required examination.

Participation in Government

Prerequisite – Social Studies 9-11 
½ Year – ½ Credit
Grade 12
Creating good active citizens is the purpose of the course. The course emphasizes the interaction between citizens and government at all levels: local, state and federal. Good citizenship and student participation in the processes of government is encouraged. Participation in Government is a performance based course.

Economics

Prerequisite – Social Studies 9-11 
½ Year – ½ Credit
Grade 12
This course includes the basic economic concepts and understandings that all people need to function effectively and intelligently as citizens and participants in the economy of the United States and the world.

Economics ECN 203 (SUPA) (3 college credits)

Prerequisite – Teacher recommendation, 90+ cumulative GPA in Social Studies, enrollment in both SUPA Economics and Public Affairs 
½ Year – ½ Credit
Grade 12
This course is an introduction to mainstream economic thought designed for students with an interest in liberal arts. The goals of this course are to introduce students to the ideas that form the foundation of modern western (Neo Classical) economic thought, to examine the basic framework (the model) that economists have built on this foundation, and to show how this model is applied to current issues facing individuals and society. The process takes students from the microeconomic to the macroeconomic level, emphasizing the connection between these two perspectives. The course prepares students to analyze and understand the on-going economic policy debate between interventionists and non-interventionists.

Public Affairs 101: 
Introduction to the Analysis of Public Policy (SUPA)
(3 college credits)

Prerequisite – Teacher recommendation, 90+ cumulative GPA in Social Studies, 
enrollment in both SUPA Economics and Public Affairs
½ Year – ½ Credit
Grade 12
This course is designed to provide students with basic research, communication, and decision-making skills used in public policy analysis. In addition, students are required to read and analyze articles from newspaper databases on local, state, and international public policy issues. The instructor determines which public policy issues are chosen for study throughout the semester. The content coverage of the course, while important, is secondary to the development of a range of applied social science skills that help the student make more informed choices as a citizen, worker, and consumer.

Social Studies Electives

Current Affairs in the 21st Century (DL)

Prerequisite – None 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 11-12
This exciting course allows students to discuss, examine, and evaluate the important events and issues taking place around the world. The major goal of this class is for students to understand and appreciate the importance of world events in their life. Some topics covered include, but not limited to: the global impact of Twitter, Facebook, and other forms of social media; the impact of steroids and other PED’s on sports; media bias; and the decline of American morals and values. Topics are covered monthly, but special emphasis is placed on staying up-to-date with news and events as they happen. This course is participation and technology-centered. Each student will be assigned a Google Chromebook. The device becomes students for the year and contains all books and readings for the course. This course is a must for students with an interest in current affairs and the events and issues that shape our world.

Holocaust Studies (DL)

Prerequisite – None 
½ Year – ½ Credit
Grades 10-12
Never Again. This was the vow we took at the conclusion of World War II. In order to assure that such a horrible time in our history does not repeat itself, it is important for students to understand exactly now Adolf Hitler came to power, legally, in a democratic nation. Once appointed chancellor, he proceeded to methodically remove civil liberties from a small group who often lived on the fringe of society. Yet few German citizens were willing to speak out. This course will focus on learning about the moral, political, and social implications of human behavior. By way of primary source documents, films, literature and discussion, Holocaust Studies will go beyond WW II to examine themes of justice, race, genocide, stereotypes, diversity, and tolerance. We will also spend time discussing additional examples of genocide, including Armenia, Cambodia, Rwanda and Darfur. This course is appropriate for mature students in grades 10-12 who are comfortable discussing sensitive, controversial subjects and sometimes viewing graphic footage.

Psychology (DL)

Prerequisite – None
½ Year – ½ Credit
Grades 11-12
The psychology course involves a systematic analysis of the behavior of humans and some animals, and the study of basic psychological phenomena. Major topics include: introduction to research methods, major schools of thought, the biological basis of behavior, consciousness, perception, learning, memory, motivation, abnormal behavior, and stress. Students will learn more about social and biological aspects of human behavior as they draw from the course material to gain insight into their life and the lives of those around them. This course seeks to follow the National High School Psychology Standards. Students will keep a journal, participate in various classroom activities, complete quarter projects, and take quizzes and tests in order to be evaluated.

Sociology (CHS) (3 college credits)

Prerequisite – None 
½ Year – 1 Credit
Grades 11-12
This course involves a systematic introduction to the major sociological concepts for understanding the structure and dynamics of contemporary society. Major topics include an introduction to social methods of inquiry, major schools of thought, culture, social structure, socialization, self and social interaction, groups and social organizations, and racial and ethnic relations. Students will learn more about their interactions with other people and with social institutions as they proceed through this area of study. Students will participate in various classroom activities, complete a final project, and take quizzes and tests in order to be evaluated in this course.

Sports History (DL)

Prerequisite – None 
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 11-12
This course journeys from the early American past to the present, giving students a compelling grasp of the historical evolution of American sporting practices. Students gain insight that will allow them to develop new and alternate perspectives, examine sports as a social and cultural phenomenon, generate a better understanding of current sport practices, and consider future developments of sport in American life.

World History Through Women’s Eyes (DL)

Prerequisite – None 
½ Year – ½ Credit
Grades 10-12
Most of our history curriculum is driving by the thoughts, actions and ideals of men. Have you ever wondered what world history looks like through a woman’s eyes? Why is it that during time periods considered “progressive” such as the Golden Age of Athens and the Renaissance periods, women were expected to stay home and tend to the children? Is women’s fashion driven by the needs and tastes of women, or is it an attempt to control and coerce them into a role “society” believes they should fill? How do women living in traditionally male-dominated societies such as China and India find ways to preserve autonomy and independence? When certain historical events are caused by a “breakdown of traditional roles and values,” is that necessarily a bad thing? Through literatures, artwork and research, students enrolled in this course will answer all of these questions and more. This course is geared towards juniors and seniors, however, motivated sophomores will benefit from seeing an alternative perspective on their required Global Studies course work.

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Capital Region BOCES Career and Tech Education

The Capital Region Career and Technical School, in collaboration with business and community partnerships, provides educational opportunities dedicated to empower students to enter the workforce, compete in a global marketplace and engage in lifelong learning.

For more information, visit the Career and Tech website.

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