Curriculum and Planning Guide

2021-2022 High School Curriculum and Planning GuideThe 2021-2022 High School Curriculum and Planning Guide is also available as a pdf here.

Graduation Requirements
School Policies
Honors and AP Courses Summary
Art
Business Education
Computer Science
Engineering
English
Family and Consumer Science
Health
Mathematics
Music Education
Physical Education
Science
Social Studies
World Languages
Career and Technical Education

Introduction

The Schalmont High School Curriculum and Planning Guide is designed to help students plan a successful, enjoyable high school experience. Planning a course of studies is one of the most important phases of a student’s entire educational program. Students are encouraged to work with their families and school counselors to plan a challenging course of studies that will help them reach their educational and post-secondary school goals.

This guide outlines graduation requirements, addresses questions commonly asked about high school programs, and provides a detailed list and description of courses offered to students. If you have questions about any of the content in this guide, please contact one of the school counselors.

Students begin to plan a high school course of studies while in the eighth grade, working with counselors at Schalmont Middle School. Students then continue planning their course of studies with high school counselors.

School counselors maintain a complete set of records on each student and are the best resource for assistance with planning an appropriate course of study. Families are encouraged to call for an appointment if any questions arise regarding the planning of their child’s high school experience.

Grade level promotion requirements

To provide enough units for graduation, each student is required to take five subjects plus physical education each year. In addition, the following requirements for promotion to the next grade level have been established.

Grade Level/Class Units of Credit Required for Promotion

  • Grade 9/Freshman: Promotion from 8th grade
  • Grade 10/Sophomore: 5.0 units, 1 of which must be English or Social Studies
  • Grade 11/Junior: 11 units, 3 of which must be in English or Social Studies
  • Grade 12/Senior: 17 units, 5 of which must be English or Social Studies

Graduation Requirements

Regents or Advanced Regents Diplomas – a student must earn 22 credits. All students must carry at least five courses per semester, one of which must be Physical Education.

Regents Diploma with Honors – a student must have an average score of 90 on all required Regents exams, including: English Language Arts (ELA), Mathematics, Science, U.S. History and Government, and Global History and Geography.

Regents Diploma with Advanced Designation with Honors – a student needs to have an average score of 90 on all required Regents examinations, including: English Language Arts (ELA), two (or three) Mathematics, two Sciences (one each in Physical Science and Life Science), U.S. History and Government, Global History and Geography, and Languages Other Than English (LOTE).

Local Diplomas will be available to some students with an IEP or 504. Additionally, some regular education students might be eligible. Counselors will guide each student individually though this process.

  • English: 4.0 credits required for Regents Diploma, 4.0 credits required for Advanced Regents Diploma
  • Social Studies: 4.0 credits required for Regents Diploma, 4.0 credits required for Advanced Regents Diploma
  • Mathematics: 3.0 credits required for Regents Diploma, 3.0 credits required for Advanced Regents Diploma
  • Science: 3.0 credits required for Regents Diploma, 3.0 credits required for Advanced Regents Diploma
  • Arts: 1.0 credit required for Regents Diploma, 1.0 credit required for Advanced Regents Diploma
  • Health: 0.5 credits required for Regents Diploma, 0.5 credits required for Advanced Regents Diploma
  • Physical Education: 2.0 credits required for Regents Diploma, 2.0 credits required for Advanced Regents Diploma
  • World Languages: 1.0 credit required for Regents Diploma, 3.0 credits required for Advanced Regents Diploma
  • Electives: 3.0 credits required for Regents Diploma, 1.0 credit required for Advanced Regents Diploma
  • Career & Financial Management: 0.5 credits required for Regents Diploma, 0.5 credits required for Advanced Regents Diploma
  • Total: 22.0 credits required for Regents Diploma, 22.00 credits required for Advanced Regents Diploma

Regents Exam Requirements

Students must pass all five of the applicable Regents exams below with a grade of 65 or higher in order to receive a high school diploma:

  • 1 English Regents
  • 1 Math Regents
  • 1 Science Regents
  • 1 Social Studies Regents

It is expected that any additional math, science or social studies Regents offered by the state will count for the fifth required examination or the CDOS certification.

Tests Required for Advanced Regents Diploma

  • Integrated Algebra, Geometry and Trigonometry
  • (2) Science Regents (One of which must be Living Environment)
  • Global Studies
  • U. S. History and Government
  • English
  • ‘Second Language

School Policies Related to Curriculum

Scheduling Timetable and Guidelines

Counselors will meet with students to review their high school plan to help develop the coming school year’s course of study. Counselors will take into consideration classroom teacher recommendations, students and family requests as well as students’ post-secondary goals to help the student create an appropriate schedule for students.

Where classes are canceled or a conflict arises in a student’s schedule, different courses will need to be selected. In most cases students will be notified before the end of the current school year of the classes that will be on their schedule for the fall. Students have until the end of their current school year to make any adjustments to those classes before the master schedule is finalized over the summer. In those cases where students request changes, parents will again be asked to sign off on those changes in a request sheet.

Dropping/Adding a Course

Schedules will not be altered to accommodate teacher requests, early dismissal or late arrival. The official add/drop period is five weeks after the beginning of a full-year course and 2.5 weeks after the beginning of a half-year course. Students dropping courses after these deadlines will receive a Drop/Failed (DF) grade on their report card. This will carry the numerical equivalent of 50.
All requests for dropping courses must be accompanied by a special schedule change form and contact from parent/guardian either by note or phone call. Students may not drop a course that is a requirement for graduation. In all cases, students must retain five courses plus Physical Education as a minimum course load.

A schedule change due to academic difficulty may be considered prior to the drop period deadlines provided:

  • A request from a parent or guardian is made.
  • A student is carrying the required number of courses.
  • A student has made a sincere effort to succeed.
  • The student, parent, teacher and school counselor are in agreement regarding the change.
  • Class balance is not disrupted by the change.

Such students may then have to add a course in its place during the second semester.

Advanced Placement (AP) Courses

AP courses prepare students to take the College Board AP exams in May. Colleges may give credit and/or advanced course placement to students who take and score well on their AP exams.

Honors (H) Courses

These courses are enriched beyond the curriculum subscribed by the NYS Regents syllabus. Students are recommended for the honors level through the use of criteria developed by each department. Criteria used will include student performance on standardized tests and locally prepared exams.

Distance Learning (DL)

Schalmont High School offers distance learning courses in Spanish Culture, Sociology, Psychology and Sports History, as well as several other course selections. The class format allows students to interact with teachers and students from other schools by way of TV monitors, video cameras and computers in the Distance Learning Lab. Students are able to raise their hands to ask a teacher a question no matter where they are located. Schalmont is the provider of some courses and the recipient of others.

College in the High Schools (CHS)

The College in the High School program through SUNY Schenectady County Community College (SUNY SCCC) is set up to allow students to earn credits toward their college education while still in high school. Courses and teachers must be approved by the college. The courses at the high school are matched with the courses at the college to be sure that the same curriculum is taught. What the college covers in one semester, the high school will cover in two semesters. In order to earn credits for the course at SUNY SCCC, participants must receive a grade of at least a “C,” while a transfer to a four-year college may require at least a “B.” By taking these courses in high school through the CHS Program, students:

  • Will pay about one third of the cost of taking the same course at the college, plus the books are provided at no charge.
  • Can reduce their college load by taking fewer credits during one or more of their college semesters.
  • Show college admissions officials that they are serious students.

Course offerings (2021-2022):

  • Human Biology (4 Credits)
  • Pre-Calculus (4 Credits)
  • Pre-Calculus Honors (4 Credits)
  • Calculus 1 (4 Credits)
  • Sociology (3 Credits)

For more information, please contact your school counselor.

University in the High School: UAlbany (UHS)

The University in the High School Program at the University at Albany provides students with the academic rigor of college-level curricula during their final year(s) of high school. Courses are regular offerings in the UAlbany catalog and are taught by carefully selected high school faculty. Once qualified, the high school faculty member becomes an adjunct professor through the UAlbany UHS program. UHS students who successfully complete the course will receive a UAlbany transcript for the college credits earned.

Course offerings (2021-2022):

  • Music Theory (3 Credits)
  • Spanish Level IV (4 Credits)
  • Spanish Level V (4 Credits)
Syracuse University Project Advance (SUPA)

Syracuse University Project Advance (SUPA) is a cooperative program between Syracuse University and participating school districts that allows high school seniors to take regular college courses in their own schools at low cost. The program enables students to rise to the challenge of college work through enrollment in introductory freshman-level courses prior to full-time college study.

SUPA also serves other important purposes: it provides in-service training for high school instructors and a continuing forum for communication between educators from high school and university settings. As an agency of the University’s Center for Instructional Development, Project Advance conducts extensive ongoing research and evaluation as part of its efforts to improve instruction.

The courses are regular offerings in the schools and colleges of Syracuse University, and are taught by carefully selected high school faculty who are trained in special workshops by SU faculty members. Grades for course work taken through Project Advance are earned in one or two semesters of class assignments and tests. As a result of their experience, Project Advance students earn a Syracuse University transcript for college credits successfully completed.

NCAA Eligibility

The NCAA has strict academic eligibility requirements for prospective student-athletes to participate in Division I and II intercollegiate athletics. Students and parents should visit www.eligibilitycenter.org to review these requirements.

Determination of Class Rank

Beginning with the Class of 2025 (fall of 2021), class rank will be calculated at the end of the third marking period of grade 12. The student with the highest average through three years and three quarters of high school will be named valedictorian of the graduating class, and the student with the second highest average will be designated as salutatorian. The courses will be weighted when determining class rank. All honors classes will be weighted by a multiplier of 1.25 when calculating class rank and GPA. All Advanced Placement and college level courses taken at Schalmont High School will be weighted by a multiplier of 1.5. The weighted and unweighted GPA will appear on a student’s transcript. All grades/courses are counted towards a student’s GPA with the exception of Physical Education. When a course is failed and later passed, the higher grade is given for passing the course with the higher average. Dropped/failed courses are given a value of 50.

For the classes of 2022-2024, class rank will be calculated at the end of the first semester for grade 12. The student with the highest average of credits earned for courses completed will be named valedictorian of the graduating class, and the student with the second highest average will be named salutatorian. There is no special weight given to any particular course when determining class rank. All grades/courses are counted towards a student’s GPA with the exception of Physical Education. When a course is failed and later passed, the higher grade is given for passing the course with the higher average. Dropped/failed courses are given a value of 50.

Graduation Ceremony Participation

Only students who have met all graduation requirements, and are eligible for a high school diploma at the June graduation exercises, will be permitted to participate in the graduation program. August or January graduates are not permitted to participate in June exercises.

Accelerated Graduation

Students who wish to complete their graduation requirements in less than four years must plan their program accordingly. The request to accelerate graduation should be made in writing, early in the high school program to the student’s guidance counselor, and will need approval from the building principal.

Student Support Services

School counselors provide an organized program of counseling, instruction and consultation to all students, including: an annual review of each student’s progress, college and career guidance and planning, advisement and counseling services, and opportunities for parental involvement. A social worker and a school psychologist are also available to assist students and parents with issues that may interfere with a student’s education.

Special Education Services

Students with disabilities work toward attaining a Regents diploma, a local diploma, or, in some cases a CDOS credential. Schalmont’s continuum of services enables them to be educated with their peers to the maximum extent appropriate. This continuum comprises the provisions of specially designed instruction and supplementary services in a variety of settings as determined appropriate by the Committee on Special Education. For more information, visit our Special Education webpage on our website, www.schalmont.org.

Transcripts

Transcripts are an official record of a student’s academic record as a high school student. Transcripts include all standardized test scores and will not be modified or changed. All scores from SAT and ACT will be reported; we cannot modify or eliminate any of the scores.

Honors and AP Course Summary

Those courses designated as honors or advanced placement (AP) are:

  • Algebra II H
  • AP English Literature and Composition
  • AP US History
  • AP Calculus AB
  • Chemistry H
  • English 10 H
  • Geometry H
  • Living Environment H
  • Pre-Calculus H

Departments and Courses List

On the following pages are a list of courses available at Schalmont High School. Some courses may have prerequisites, so be sure to read course descriptions carefully. The symbols below signify special courses:

  • AP – Advanced Placement Course
  • DL – Distance Learning Course
  • H – Honors Course
  • SUPA – Syracuse University Project Advance Course
  • CHS – College in the High School Course – SUNY SCCC credit
  • UHS – University in the High School Course – UAlbany credit
  • PLTW – Project Lead the Way – RIT

Art

Art courses are available for students with an interest in majoring in art and those who desire to take one or two introductory courses in the field.

Studio in Art
Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grades: 9-12
Studio in Art is a comprehensive, full-year course that includes art production (making art in various forms), art history, and art criticism. Students will explore techniques used in various forms of drawing, painting, sculpture and design. This course may be used to satisfy the art/music requirement for graduating high school. This course must be completed before taking any other art elective.

Drawing and Painting I
Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 10-12
Drawing and Painting I is a comprehensive, in-depth study of two-dimensional art forms. Students will explore a variety of techniques in both drawing and painting media. Various artists and art movements will be discussed in relation to students’ projects.

Drawing and Painting II/III
Prerequisite: Studio in Art and Drawing and Painting 1 Credit: 1 /Full Year
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 10-12
Students in Drawing and Painting II/III will explore more advanced techniques and materials related to both drawing and painting media. Various artists and art movements will be discussed in relationship to students’ projects.

Sculpture I
Prerequisite: Studio in Art
Credit: 1
Grades: 10-12
Students will explore three-dimensional art forms and work with a variety of media: clay, plaster, wood, metal, and stone. Students will learn to construct, mold, model and manipulate various materials into a completed art work. Artists of the past and present will be discussed as they relate to various projects.

Sculpture II/III
Prerequisite: Studio in Art, Sculpture I
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grades: 11-12
Students in Sculpture II/III will explore more advanced techniques and materials related to three-dimensional art forms.

Digital Photography A, B
Prerequisite – Studio in Art
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grades: 11-12
Digital photography incorporates the fundamentals of film photography and the advancements of today’s technology. Students will learn the features of the camera, how to compose and shoot interesting photographs, and how to manipulate and edit photos using software. The course covers the history of photography, the different types of professional photography and highlights famous photographers who have made a significant contribution to photography.

Business Education

The Business Education Department is now offering a sequence for which students can earn an Advanced Regents Diploma in Business. To complete the sequence, a student must take and pass Accounting I, Business Law, Principles of Marketing, Personal Finance, and Careers and Financial Management.

Accounting I (DL)
Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grades: 10-12
Accounting is the language of business. Students planning to major in business or a related field in college will need to learn to “speak the language.” This course will provide students with entry-level job skills (bank teller, bookkeeper, accounting clerk, etc.) as well as personal use skills such as maintaining and balancing a personal checkbook and debit card, understanding payroll procedures, and preparing income tax returns. Students will learn accounting concepts and procedures by working through a complete accounting cycle for both a sole proprietorship service business and a corporation merchandising business.

Business Law (DL)
Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grades: 11-12
The Business Law course will teach students about the criminal justice system and how it all began. Emphasis is on law as individuals may encounter it in business, occupational or personal life. By studying true situations and cases, learn how business and personal law impacts the personal lives of young people and adults. Modules include ethics in law, tort or civil law, criminal law, the court system, personal injury law, insurance, contracts, real property, laws of minors and family law. Mock trials will be conducted during this course.

Career and Financial Management
Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5/Half Year
Grade: 10
The Career and Financial Management course will enable students to explore a variety of careers and learn critical skills to be career- and college-ready after high school. Students will utilize the school counseling program Naviance to explore different career options and identify the training, skills and post-secondary education that will be required to be successful in that field. Additionally, students will explore independent financial management to learn to efficiently handle personal finance and consumption expenditures.

Personal Finance (DL)
Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grades: 11-12
The Personal Finance course will provide students with the background and attitudes essential for making good financial decisions both now and in the future. The course begins with a unit on financial planning, including budgeting and career planning. Information on banking, credit cards, checking accounts, investing, income taxes, insurance and understanding paycheck deductions will be covered. A project will be done on purchasing an automobile, funding college and renting an apartment. The class will participate in the “stock market game,” competing with students from schools across the country.

Sports Marketing (DL)
Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 10-12
This course introduces students to the important role that marketing plays in our economic system. Content revolves around the basic marketing function. Selling, promotion, pricing, purchasing, product, service, idea planning and distribution are covered. Projects are developed to give students hands-on experience using these functions. Students will “create” their own products, design a radio commercial, logos, slogans and jingles as well as create a television commercial.

Computer Science

Students will have the opportunity to learn computer science and programing through rigorous college-level course work and instruction in the computer science education sequence of instruction.

Computer Science Discovery
Prerequisite: None
Credits: 1/Full Year
Grade: 9-12
This course is designed as an introduction to computer science for high school students who want to express themselves creatively and solve problems that are interesting to them using computational devices. This course is designed for students that have little or no experience studying computer science. Through a series of engaging, hands-on labs and projects, students learn the fundamentals of computer programming. Students will explore web design as they create their own website with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. Finally, students will explore drawing, animation and problem solving using Python. Throughout the course, computing history and current events in computer science will be incorporated. Special topics in computer science such as encryption, human-computer interaction, rapid prototyping and others may be explored.

CSIS 110 – Intro to CS: Multimedia with Python
Prerequisite: Computer Science Discovery
Credits: 3 credits
Grade: 9-12
This course is a broad introduction to a variety of fundamental topics in computer science through the theme of graphic augmentation. Students will consider problems in the application area that can be solved with software. Students will be introduced to important areas of computer science including abstraction, computer organization, representation of information, history of computing, ethics, and the development and evaluation of algorithmic solutions using an appropriate programming environment.

Engineering

The Engineering course study introduces students to the Project Lead the Way curriculum to help them understand the field of engineering and engineering technology. Students will explore various engineering systems while gaining an understanding of how engineers address the social and political consequences of technological change. Through hands-on projects and relevant instruction, students will gain a good understanding of what a career in Engineering is truly like.

Project Lead the Way I: Introduction to Engineering Design
Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 9
This course teaches problem-solving skills using a design development process. Models of product solutions are created, analyzed and communicated using solid modeling computer design software. In New York State, Circuit Test the course is called Design and Drawing for Production and follows the syllabus developed by the State Education Department. (Software used – AutoDesk Inventor.)

Project Lead the Way II: Principles of Engineering
Prerequisite: PLTW I
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 10
This is a survey course of engineering, exposing students to some of the major concepts they will encounter in a postsecondary engineering course of study. Students will be provided with the opportunity to develop their skills and understanding of course concepts through activity, project and problem-based learning. Topics include mechanisms, energy sources, energy applications, machine control, fluid power, statics, material properties, material testing, statistics and kinematics.

Project Lead the Way III: Digital Electronics
Prerequisite: PLTW II
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 11
This is a course in applied logic that encompasses the application of electronic circuits and devices. Computer simulation software is used to design and test digital circuitry prior to the actual construction of circuits and devices. (Software used – MultiSim.)

Project Lead the Way IV: Civil Engineering and Architecture
Prerequisite – PLTW III
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 12
This course studies the design and construction of residential and commercial building projects. It provides students with an introduction to many of the factors involved in building design and construction, including building components and systems, structural design, storm water management, site design, utilities and services, cost estimation, energy efficiency, and careers in the design and construction industry.

English

Students must take four years of English (English 9, 10, 11 and 12) as a requirement for graduation. The English Department plans each course to help meet the objectives of a positive language arts curriculum that stresses the four elements of reading, writing, listening and speaking.

English 9
Credits: 1/Full Year
Grade: 9
English 9 establishes the departmental focus on both shared and independent reading by prioritizing reading in classroom routines. Students will develop skills and build resilience as readers of complex texts as they read and respond to informational and literary texts. They will analyze authors’ choices and attend to the range of ways authors use writing to engage and impact readers using mentor texts. Students will receive direct instruction in crafting and building arguments, informational texts and narratives as they study the role of language, audience and purpose. Students in this course will set goals and regularly reflect on their growth as readers, writers and thinkers.

English 10
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 10
English 10 continues the departmental focus on independent reading and shared texts by prioritizing daily reading in classroom routines. Students continue to engage in independent reading, working to build stamina and resilience as readers of complex texts. Students will engage in self-exploration and goal setting as they learn about themselves as readers and writers and transfer their reading comprehension knowledge to their own writing. Students will study authors’ craft in a variety of genres and use mentor texts as models for their own writing. Scaffolded writing lessons and on-going modeling and sharing of student and teacher work establishes a Writing Workshop approach that serves to guide students as they work to complete literary analysis, argument, informational and narrative pieces. Students will work closely, write collaboratively and revise their written work of various genres and themes, and create a writing portfolio with both newly polished and revised pieces from the year. They reflect upon themselves as readers and writers in a final reflective essay included in their portfolio that establishes their growth from September to June. Students will use Writer’s Notebooks to practice and develop their writing craft.

English 10 (H)
Prerequisite: ELA 8 scores; completion of English 9; English 9 average; Teacher recommendation
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 10
This course requires rigorous reading, both over the summer and during the school year. It begins at the conclusion of the freshman year. Students will read, analyze and interpret significant literature from a number of time periods and genres. The emphasis is on critical reading and writing, and students are expected to accept considerable responsibility for the main reading, writing and research projects. Students continue to engage in independent reading, working to build stamina and resilience as readers of complex texts. Students will engage in self-exploration and goal setting as they learn about themselves as readers and writers and transfer their reading comprehension knowledge to their own writing. Students will study authors’ craft in a variety of genres and use mentor texts as models for their own writing. Scaffolded writing lessons and ongoing modeling and sharing of student and teacher work establishes a Writing Workshop approach that serves to guide students as they work to complete literary analysis, argument, informational and narrative pieces. Students will work closely, write collaboratively and revise their written work of various genres and themes, and create a writing portfolio with both newly polished and revised pieces from the year. They reflect upon themselves as readers and writers in a final reflective essay included in their portfolio that establishes their growth from September to June. Students will use Writer’s Notebooks to practice and develop their writing craft. Students who earn a final course average of an 88 or higher and receive the teacher’s recommendation will be enrolled in English 11 AP.

English 11
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 11
English 11 focuses on students’ development as critical readers, writers and thinkers through their study of literature, informational texts, complex arguments and narratives. Throughout this course, students will continue to strengthen their reading strategies as they study a range of genres. Through shared texts, students will analyze authors’ craft and use of literary techniques, which will serve as models for their own writing. Students will build complex arguments that rely on ideas garnered from multiple texts as they support their claims and counterclaims and evaluate key components of effective arguments. Through self-generated questions, students will embark on an inquiry into college and career exploration as they refine their research skills and take the first steps in exploring a post-secondary plan. Students will think, research, write, revise and edit as they engage in the writing process throughout the course. This course will prepare students to meet the challenges of the NYS Regents exam in English Language Arts in January of the junior year.

AP English Literature and Composition (English 11)
Prerequisite: 88+ average in English 10 (H), teacher recommendation, and completion of summer reading assignment
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 11
Qualified students can elect to take English Literature and Composition (AP) in their junior year, which gives them the opportunity to complete college-level work while in high school. The course requires rigorous reading during the school year, which begins at the end of the sophomore year when the summer reading assignment is given. Students will read, analyze and interpret significant literature from a number of time periods and genres with an emphasis on continued critical reading, thinking and writing. Students are expected to accept considerable responsibility for completion of many reading and writing tasks. Course participants are required to sit for the AP exam in Literature and Composition (fee required) in May of their junior year and the NYS Common Core English Regents in January. Those who complete the English (AP) course are given first preference for enrollment in Syracuse University Project Advance (SUPA) courses for their senior year.

English 12
Prerequisite: English 9-11 or English 9 and English Honors/ AP
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 12
English 12 focuses on the development of critical thinkers and problem solvers in not only reading and writing but across disciplines and in the real world, whether college or career. Students will engage in both independent reading and shared literature. They will read primarily for author’s craft and notice important decisions authors make around literary elements, structure and point of view. During this course, students will engage in various literary texts as they continue to build their independent reading habits, which will lead them to drafting and revising a literary analysis. In addition to the reading and writing skills in English 12, students will identify and analyze problems, generate questions and implement well-reasoned solutions, incorporate multiple perspectives, constructively responding to feedback from various stakeholders, and continue to engage in self-reflection as they become college and career ready. Students will engage in metacognition as they reflect on their writing and assessment of their writing strengths and weaknesses, understand patterns in their own writing, and work towards understanding the process of writing.

English 12 (6 SUPA)
Prerequisite: English 9-11 or English 9 and English Honors/ AP, 85 or higher on English Regents Exam, recommendation of teacher
Credit: 1/Full Year (6 College Credits)
Grade: 12
Instead of enrolling in English 12, qualified students can elect to take college-level English through the Syracuse University Project Advance (SUPA) courses. Two one-semester courses make up the English offering for Project Advance. Minimal requirements: students should have passed the English Regents exam with at least an 85, and have a “B” average or higher in English and the recommendation of their teacher. In addition, students who have completed the English Honors/ AP two-year sequence will be given first preference for enrollment. The Project Advance courses require a tuition payment set by Syracuse University, which awards course credit for those students earning a minimum of a “C” grade for the course. Students who complete the course satisfactorily are often exempted from college English requirements and earn 6 college credits; more than 600 colleges and universities accept Project Advance credits.

English 12: Writing Studio 1 (SUPA)
Writing Studio 1 (WRT 105) is the first of two English courses offered through the Writing Program at Syracuse University. It is required of all students in one semester of their senior year. Studio 1 pays particular attention to writing formal academic analytic persuasive papers. Students confer with the teacher on an individual basis, revise frequently and read from a variety of texts.

English 12: English and Textual Studies Class & Literary Texts (SUPA)
The English and Textual Studies: Class & Literary Text (ETS 181) course presents students with many different forms of reading and makes students aware that their understanding and appreciation of what they read may vary from culture to culture, from time period to time period, and depend upon issues connected to socioeconomic class. The focus of the course is on literary theory set in an historical framework. Concepts such as social stratification, inequality, and the relationship among wealth, privilege, and power provide critical lenses through which to interpret texts and foster a richer understanding of students’ own implications within these systems of power and even perhaps to act as a springboard for advocacy and direct social action.

English AIS (Academic Intervention Services)
Students are recommended to take this class based on previous scores on the 8th grade ELA exam, teacher recommendations and class scores in high school ELA. This class will provide students with the literacy support needed in all content classrooms as well as the skills needed to successfully complete the English Common Core Regents.

Film and Literature
Prerequisite: English 9 and 10
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 11 or 12
This course explores the intersection of film and literature, including the ways in which movies can be analyzed as works of literature unto themselves and the ways in which literature is taken from the page to the screen. We will examine the decisions writers, directors and actors make to bring characters, conflicts, symbols and themes to life in film. Open to junior and seniors, this course would be taken in addition to English 11 or 12.

Creative Writing
Prerequisite: English 9 and 10
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 11 or 12
Writing is one of the most powerful tools individuals have in our arsenal of communication. It allows us to evoke emotion, persuade, inform and entertain, sometimes all within the same piece of writing. Throughout this course, we will explore creative works and use them as springboards to inspire our own writings. Open to juniors and seniors, this course would be taken in addition to English 11 or 12.

Family and Consumer Science

The mission of the Family and Consumer Science Department is to help students become competent, self-reliant, confident and caring individuals while managing their personal lives, family and careers.

Chef’s Class
Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5/Half Year
Grade: 11
This is a beginning-level cooking class for students who either wish to pursue careers in the food industry as nutritionists, dieticians or chefs, or just want to learn how to cook for themselves.

Advanced Chef’s Class
Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5/Half Year
Grade: 11-12
This course is filled with competition and challenges for the serious or very interested young chef. Using today’s food interests and some of TV’s game show-like style, students learn to improve their cooking skills and widen their food interests.

Child Development
Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5/Half Year
Grade: 11-12
This course is recommended for students interested in careers in education, nursing, counseling or human services. Baby simulators are used as a class project and provide a challenging “parenting” experience. The course studies children’s growth and development from birth through adolescence.

Child Psychology
Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5/Half Year
Grade: 11-12
Topics of discussion and research include learning disabilities, intelligence, attachment and bonding, social and emotional development of children from birth through adolescence. Students also study leading theories in the field of child psychology.

Fashion Industry (DL)
Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5/Half Year
Grade: 11
New York has long been the center of the fashion, apparel and accessories industries. Global Fashion Studies prepares students for careers and higher education in these exciting and ever-changing fields. In this two-year program, students learn about garment theory, textiles, manufacturing, sales and promotion, and career and college opportunities. Global Fashion Studies year one focuses on merchandising, and year two focuses on marketing and retailing including mastery of skill standards set by the National Retail Federation. Students learn through specialized software, hands-on projects, lectures and guest speakers, videos, field trips, work-based learning experiences such as job shadowing and internships, and community service. Through a yearlong entrepreneurship project, students work together to design a product, conduct market research and produce and sell their creations. They also create a professional portfolio showcasing their best work.

Housing & Interior Design
Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5/Half Year
Grade: 11
This course will cover housing, which is a basic human need. Changing global demographics have created housing issues that must be satisfied for individuals and families across the lifespan through innovative design solutions. In addition, housing is a personal and family expense. This course utilizes Computer Aided Design.

Entrepreneurship
Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5/Half Year
Grade: 9-12
This course provides an opportunity for you to analyze your skills in relation to owning a business. Students will develop a business plan and utilize an in-school business that includes applying business principles, creating and maintaining a budget, and developing a marketing strategy for the in-school business.

Health

The Health Education course of study helps our students understand behaviors that promote wellness, while developing and implementing strategies to improve the overall health and lifelong wellness of the student.

Health
Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5/Half Year
Grades: 10-12
This required course is designed to cover the critical areas of health. The topics covered include, but are not limited to: nutrition, alcohol, tobacco and other drugs, relationships, non-communicable and communicable diseases, human sexuality, injury prevention, stress management, and mental health. The course focuses on the consequences of harmful behaviors that relate to young adults.

Human Sexuality
Prerequisite: Health
Credit: .5/Half Year
Grade: 12
This course will focus on the following topics: character in relationships, dating and abstinence, violent relationships, reproductive health, STDs and HIV/AIDS, marriage and parenthood, pregnancy and childbirth, and birth control methods. The course emphasizes the use of refusal skills, making responsible decisions, and practicing abstinence as ways to reduce teen pregnancies and exposure to STDs.

Nutrition – Weight Management
Prerequisite: Health
Credit: .5/Half Year
Grade: 12
This course will focus on the following topics: physical activity for life, nutrition and your health, and managing weight and body composition. It also focuses on the importance of maintaining a healthy weight in order to reduce the probability of developing heart disease, cancer and adult-onset diabetes.

Mathematics

The Mathematics Department offers a wide variety of course work designed to meet all of our students’ needs, while challenging students with rigorous instruction. The course design enables students to apply mathematical ways of thinking and while preparing them to think and reason mathematically. The math instruction allows for college- and career-readiness, by helping students develop a depth of understanding and ability to apply mathematics situations as college students and employees regularly do.

Math Progressions Chart

Algebra 1
Prerequisite: 75+ Average in Math 8, Passed Math 6 and 7, Teacher Recommendation
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 9
This course will be based on the Algebra 1 Common Core learning standards adopted by New York State. The course focuses on the relationships between quantities and reasoning with equations, descriptive statistics, linear and exponential relationships, expressions and equations, quadratic functions and expressions. A Regents exam will be taken in June. The TI-84, TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition, or the TI-84 Plus CE calculator is required for this course.

Algebra 1 – Part 1
Prerequisite: 8th Grade Mathematics, Teacher recommendation
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 9
This is the first year of a two-year algebra course leading to the Algebra Regents. Part of the curriculum is dedicated to strengthening students’ foundational skills. This course will follow half of the Algebra 1 Common Core Learning standards adopted by New York State. The TI-84 or TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition calculator is required for this course. A final is taken at the end of the course in June.

Algebra 1 with Lab
Prerequisite: Math 8; Teacher recommendation
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 9
This course will be based on the Algebra 1 Common Core learning standards adopted by New York State. The class will follow the same curriculum and course of study as the Algebra 1 course. Students will be scheduled for an additional period every other day with their math teacher for additional math instruction. The lab period will provide students with the opportunity to acquire the course content, develop an understanding of the learning standards, and acquire the math skills necessary for success on the Algebra Regents Exam taken in June. The TI-84 or TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition calculator is required for this course.

Algebra 1 – Part 2
Prerequisite: Algebra 1 – Part 1
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 10
This is the second year of a two-year algebra course leading to the Algebra Regents. This course will finish the Algebra 1 Common Core Learning standards adopted by New York State. The TI-84 or TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition calculator is required for this course. A Regents exam will be taken in June.

Geometry
Prerequisite: 75% + Average in Algebra 1, passing grade on Algebra 1 Regents, Teacher recommendation
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 9-12
This course will focus on the fundamental concepts of the Geometry Common Core learning standards adopted by New York State. The course will focus on the congruence, similarity, construction, transformation and proof of figures, trigonometric ratios, three-dimensional figures, connecting algebra and geometry through coordinates, and circles with and without coordinates. The TI-84 or TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition calculator is required for this course. A Regents exam will be taken in June.

Geometry with Lab
Prerequisite: A final average of 65% in Algebra 1 or Algebra 1 Part 2; Passing grade on Algebra 1 Regents Exam; Teacher recommendation
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 10/11
This course will focus on the fundamental concepts of the Geometry Common Core learning standards as adopted by New York State. The class will follow the same curriculum and course of study as the Geometry course. Students will be scheduled for an additional period every other day with their math teacher for additional math instruction. The lab period will provide students with the opportunity to acquire the course content, develop an understanding of the learning standards, and acquire the math skills necessary for success on the Geometry Regents Exam taken in June. The TI-84 or TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition calculator is required for this course.

Geometry Honors
Prerequisite: Requires 93+ average in Algebra 1 Honors 80%+ on Algebra 1 Regents Exam, Teacher recommendation
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 9
This course is designed for accelerated students. This course will be based on the Geometry Common Core learning standards adopted by New York State. The course will focus on the congruence, similarity, construction, transformation and proof of figures, trigonometric ratios, three-dimensional figures, connecting algebra and geometry through coordinates, and circles with and without coordinates. The TI-84 or TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition calculator is required for this course. A Regents exam will be taken in June.

Topics in Geometry
Prerequisite: Algebra 1 or Algebra 1-Part 2, passing grade on Algebra 1 Regents Exam, Teacher recommendation
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 10-11
This course will be based on the Geometry Common Core learning standards adopted by New York State. It is designed for students who need more instructional time to meet these standards. The course will focus on the congruence, similarity, construction, transformation and proof of figures, trigonometric ratios, three-dimensional figures, connecting algebra and geometry through coordinates, and circles with and without coordinates. The TI-84 or TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition calculator is required for this course. A final exam will be taken in June.

Algebra II Honors
Prerequisite: 93% average in Geometry Honors, 75% + on Geometry Regents and 80%+ on Algebra Regents, Teacher recommendation
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 10
This is the third course in the three-year Regents sequence designed for accelerated students. The course is based on the Algebra 2 Common Core learning standards adopted by New York State. The course will focus on polynomial, rational, and radical relationships, trigonometry, exponential and logarithmic functions, probability, and statistics. The TI-84 or TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition calculator is required for this course. Regents exam will be taken in June.

Algebra II
Prerequisite: Geometry, Teacher recommendation
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 11
This is the third course in the three-year Regents sequence based on the Algebra 2 Common Core learning standards adopted by New York State. The course will focus on polynomial, rational, and radical relationships, trigonometry, exponential and logarithmic functions, probability, and statistics. The TI-84 or TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition calculator is required for this course. Regents exam will be taken in June.

Topics in Algebra II
Prerequisite: Geometry or Topics in Geometry
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 11-12
This course will be based on the Algebra 2 Common Core learning standards adopted by New York State. It is designed for students who need more instructional time to meet these standards. The course will focus on polynomial, rational, and radical relationships, introduction to relations and functions, quadratics, and complex numbers. The TI-84 or TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition calculator is required for this course. A final exam will be taken in June.

Algebra II Part 2
Prerequisite: Topics in Algebra II
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 11-12
This course will be based on the Algebra 2 Common Core learning standards adopted by New York State. It is a continuation of the Algebra 2-Part 1 course. The course will focus on trigonometry, exponential and logarithmic functions, probability and statistics, as well as continuing to review the topics in Algebra 2 Part 1. The TI-84 or TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition calculator is required for this course. Regents exam will be taken in June.

Pre-Calculus (CHS)
Prerequisite: 85+ average in Algebra 2, teacher recommendation
Credit: 1/Full Year (4 college credits)
Grade: 12
This course prepares students for a basic level calculus course in college. Topics include analytic geometry, advanced algebra and trigonometry, polynomial functions, conic sections, and graphing polar equations. The graphing calculator is used extensively. This class is currently being offered from SCCC (MAT 167). Students take a local final exam in June.

Pre-Calculus Honors (CHS)
Prerequisite: 85+ average in Algebra 2, 75% + on Algebra 2 Regents, Teacher recommendation
Credit: 1/Full Year (4 college credits)
Grade: 11
This course is the prerequisite for those students planning on taking AP Calculus in their senior year. Topics include analytic geometry, advanced algebra, matrix algebra, techniques of graphing, transcendental and algebraic functions, advanced trigonometry, limits, and an introduction to calculus. This class is currently being offered from SCCC (MAT 167). Students take a local final exam in June.

AP Calculus AB
Prerequisite: 93%+ average in Pre-Calculus Honors, teacher recommendation
Credit: 1/Full Year (4 college credits)
Grade: 12
This course includes all topics from the AP Calculus course and selected topics from the BC course published by the College Entrance Exam Board. Students take the Advanced Placement exam in May. Many students receive college credit after their chosen school evaluates their scores. Topics include derivatives and integrals of polynomials, algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and limits. Application problems include graphing, velocity, acceleration, related rates, maximum and minimum values, mean value, areas, volumes, growth, and decay and work. After the AP exam, students study topics from advanced integration.

Calculus 1 (CHS)
Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus (H), teacher recommendation
Credit: 1/Full Year (4 college credits)
Grade: 12
This course, in the calculus of a single variable, includes limits, continuity, derivatives of algebraic and transcendental functions, implicit differentiation, related rates, the Mean Value Theorem, antiderivatives, definite integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. The course introduces applications of differentiation such as curve sketching and optimization problems as well as applications of integration such as area and average value. This course is currently being offered from SCCC (MAT180). Students take a local final exam in June.

Financial Algebra/Real World Mathematics
Prerequisite: 3 High School Math Credits
Credit 1/Full Year
Grade: 12
This course emphasizes contemporary applications of mathematics. Topics include, but are not limited to, personal finance, retirement and savings, automotive equity, credit card debt, personal income tax, geographic measurement, and the stock market. Students utilize Chromebooks to access mathematical features of spreadsheets and measurement tools related to Google maps. Students are introduced to a concept and apply it through a lab project completed and submitted online. Students take a local final in June.

Statistics
Prerequisite: Algebra 2
Credit 1/Full Year
Grade: 12
This course focuses on the following topics: descriptive statistics, an introduction to probability, random variables and probability, distributions, the binomial and normal probability distributions, sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, chi-square distributions, linear correlation and regression. Students take a local final exam in June.

Music Education

The Schalmont High School Music Department offers students an opportunity for a well-rounded, useful music education. The department strives to develop musical excellence through a threefold progression. The music program includes the teaching and development of technical music skills, the appreciation of all types of music literature, and individual performing experiences through participation in musical organizations. All students enrolled in music performance courses must adhere to the department attendance policy as stated in the Student Handbook. Performing groups can meet the 24 Regents Action Plan requirements in the art of music.

Concert Band
Prerequisite: Previous Band Experience
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 9-12
This course will involve the study, preparation and performance of music in the band repertoire. Students will be required to spend additional outside school time in preparation for this course. All students will be required to take a weekly instruction period in school or with an approved private music instructor outside of school. Also, students will be required to adhere to the music policy given to each student at the beginning of each year. The course meets daily for one period.

Wind Ensemble
Prerequisite: By Audition Only, Level H, R
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 9-12
Students will perform music more challenging than Concert Band. This will be a select ensemble numbering no more than 45 students. Requirements for credit are the same as Concert Band.

Jazz Ensemble
Prerequisite: Be enrolled in Concert Band or Wind Ensemble and successfully complete a separate audition if necessary
Credit: 0/Full Year
Grade: 9-12
This course will involve the study, preparation and performance of jazz repertoire. The music to be studied will be taken from all periods of jazz, which will enable the student to become acquainted with different forms and sounds of jazz. Students will be required to prepare outside of school for the course and must demonstrate continued progress in order to remain in the course. The course will meet weekly, after school hours, for one hour, from September to the end of the year.

Chorus
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 9-12
This course will engage students in the study, preparation and performance of music in the choral repertoire. The objective of chorus is the development of strong singing skills, as well as the ability to become a good music reader and musician. Rehearsals consist of instruction in individual and group voice production, interpretation of all music selections and the study of pertinent music theory applications. Many different styles of music are studied and performed, culminating in three evening performances and several extracurricular concerts that are scheduled throughout the school year. Participation fosters interpersonal group skills, camaraderie and the joy of singing with others.

Concert Choir
Prerequisite: By audition only
Credit: 1 /Full Year
Grade: 9-12
Students in Chorus may audition at the end of each school year for a position in this select choir. Students accepted must demonstrate exceptional musical abilities and knowledge, and possess a strong work ethic. Repertoire selected in this performing group is of a higher caliber than Chorus, and requires students who are willing to strive for a higher level of excellence. All students will be required to take a weekly vocal lesson in school or may study privately on a weekly basis with an approved private music instructor. Students participating in this group are eligible to apply for positions in exciting extracurricular choir opportunities, such as the Melodies of Christmas Choir, Area All-State Choir and All-State Choir.

Music Theory (UHS – UAlbany/ Capstone)
Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1/Full Year (3 College Credits)
Grade: 10-12
This course is designed to help students master all of the essential aspects of music. Course content includes the study of the following: rhythm, pitch, key signatures, scales, intervals, chords, melody and harmony. At the completion of this class, students will be able to “dissect” musical compositions as well as learn strategies that will assist them in writing their own music. Also included in this class is a brief overview of music history, beginning in the Middle Ages and proceeding through the 19th century. No previous musical background or talent is necessary for the completion of this class. This class is recommended for students who are interested in pursuing a career in music, anticipate taking music classes in college, or simply enjoy listening to or performing music.

Music Courses
History of Rock Music (DL)
Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 9-12
This class will cover the history of rock music from the 1950s into the 1990s. After a brief foundational study of beginnings of rhythm and blues through the influence of the African-American culture, we will proceed into the explosive sound of rock music beginning with Elvis Presley and rockabilly. We’ll look at the British Invasion, as the Beatles, The Who, and the Rolling Stones invade America in the 60s. The counterculture and the bands that performed Woodstock as the hippie movement stormed from coast to coast. The heavy metal movement started by bands such as Black Sabbath and Led Zeppelin. Progressive rock featuring the incredible keyboardists in bands like Genesis, Pink Floyd and Kansas. The grunge movement and the sounds of Seattle featuring bands such as Nirvana, Soundgarden and Pearl Jam. The Southern rock of Lynyrd Skynyrd, ZZ Top and the Allman Bros. Band. American rock featuring Van Halen, the Foo Fighters and KISS. British metal bands like Iron Maiden, Judas Priest and Def Leppard. This only scratches the surface of the many groups we will take an in-depth look at as we bring rock music into our classroom. Each year we cover new bands, so students can take this class every year of high school and always hear new bands and the exciting music that made them famous.

Physical Education

All high school students are required by the New York State Education Department to take Physical Education. The course is offered every other day.

Physical Education 9, 10
Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5/Full Year
Grade: 9-10
Freshman/sophomore Physical Education includes instruction in lifetime activities, team and individual sports. Specific activities include, but are not limited to: hands only CPR/AED, archery, ultimate Frisbee, soccer, football, volleyball, basketball, badminton, pickleball, team handball, tennis, fitness and a variety of novelty games.

Physical Education 11, 12
Prerequisite: Physical Education 9, 10
Credit: .5/Full Year
Grade: 11-12
Junior/senior Physical education includes activities that are offered in the grade 9-10 program and also a fitness/walking program. Students are able to choose from hands only CPR/AED, physical fitness, lifetime activities, team and individual sports and cooperative games daily.

Science

The Science Department offers a wide variety of course selection and electives to meet all of our students’ course requirements and interests. From the required graduation requirements to college courses and electives such as Human Biology, Forensics and Environmental Studies, students have the opportunity to challenge themselves while getting the academic support needed to achieve success. Students are required to successfully complete three units of study and earn a passing score on one Regents exam in science to graduate with a Regents diploma. Of the three units, one must be from the Living Environment curriculum and one from the Physical Setting. Students in pursuit of an Advanced Regents diploma are required to pass two Regents exams (one Physical Science and one Life Science).

The Science Department strongly recommends that students pursue four units of study in science upon graduation. Regardless of our students’ post-secondary plans, we believe that taking four years of science in high school will better prepare our students for their future.

Science Progressions Chart

The following courses have a separate lab that meets two days out of the four-day cycle:

  • Physical Setting/Earth Science
  • Living Environment
  • Living Environment Honors
  • Physical Setting/Chemistry
  • Physical Setting/Chemistry Honors
  • Physical Setting/Physics

Physical Setting/Earth Science
Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade 9
This course is a student-centered and inquiry-based study of the systems and processes that shape the Earth, its resources, and its numerous environments. This course also investigates the human race’s role within these systems, processes and environments and the impact our daily actions may have. The major topics of the course are Geology, Meteorology, Oceanography, Astronomy and Human Impacts. Most importantly, an emphasis will be placed on how we know what we know about Earth Science by investigating the development of theories and engaging in science and engineering practices. This is a Regents-level course that fulfills one year of the required three years of science needed for graduation. At the conclusion of this course, students will have practiced the essential skills of a scientific mind. By obtaining, evaluating and communicating information, students will be able to ask questions and define problems, construct explanations and design solutions, as well as, develop and use models to explain scientific phenomena.

Physical Setting/Earth Science Lab
This laboratory is an integral part of the Earth Science curriculum and must be taken by all students enrolled in Earth Science even if the student is repeating the course. Laboratory time is used to give students supplemental, hands-on practice in planning and carrying out investigations, engaging in argument from evidence, as well as analyzing and interpreting data through mathematical and computational practices. Students must successfully complete the equivalent of 30 laboratory exercises in order to take the Regents Exam in Earth Science. The grade for this part of the course is averaged into the quarter grade for Earth Science.

Living Environment
Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade 10
Living Environment is a required course for graduation. Students will use science and engineering practices to learn about living organisms. Focus of study includes how matter and energy move through ecosystems and individual organisms. Students will evaluate the stability and changes that occur within ecosystems, use models to investigate the inheritance and variation of traits among organisms, construct explanations on the structure and function of systems and DNA within multicellular organisms. Students will also explain, based on evidence, natural selection and evolution within populations. This course ends with the Regents exam in June.

Living Environment Honors
Prerequisite: Earth Science Final average of 92% or higher, and 90% or above on mid-term and Earth Science Regents
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade 9-10
The Honors course follows the same curriculum as the Regents level but moves at a slightly faster pace and goes further in depth on some concepts. The course ends with a Regents exam in June.

Living Environment Lab
Lab is required for all students taking the Living Environment course. Any pupil enrolled in this program must complete the lab requirements. The students will use mathematical analysis, scientific inquiry, and engineering and design to pose questions, seek answers and develop solutions. The student is required to satisfactorily complete a minimum of 30 laboratory experiments, four of which are mandated by New York State in order to take the Regents Exam in Living Environment.

Physical Setting/Chemistry
Prerequisite: Living Environment, Integrated Algebra
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 11-12
Chemistry is strongly recommended for any college-bound student. Students will investigate matter and its interactions. They will explore the structure of an atom and patterns in the periodic table. Students will explore the interactions of atoms and molecules as illustrated by chemical reactions. Students will investigate and model the factors that drive chemical and physical changes based on their understanding of the elements. Concepts and skills are reinforced by a strong emphasis on hands-on laboratory experiences. Students will take the Regents Chemistry Exam.

Physical Setting/Chemistry Honors
Prerequisite: Living Environment, Integrated Algebra, Final average 92% or higher Grade 10 and 90% or above in Living Environment midterm and Regents
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 10-12
The honors program is an enrichment of the chemistry course. Each unit that is taught goes in greater depth and at a faster pace. All students will take the Regents Exam in Chemistry. Laboratory investigations explain science as a process of inquiry and investigation to explain natural phenomena, providing guidelines and methods for designing and conducting experiments. The student must successfully complete 30 lab exercises to qualify for the Regents Exam in Chemistry. The grade for the lab part of the course will be averaged into the quarter class grade.

Physical Setting/Physics
Prerequisite: Living Environment, completed Geometry or above
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grades: 11-12
Physics is the study of the basic nature of the world around us and is the foundation of modern science and technology. Physics is strongly recommended for any college-bound student. The main focus of the course is the development of conceptual understanding of basic concepts of physics as well as problem-solving skills. The five main topics are mechanics, energy, wave phenomena, electricity and magnetism, and modern physics. The course uses basic algebra and involves experiments, projects and formulas that explain the basic laws of the physical world. Physics will give students an essential foundation for real understanding in later study of engineering, professional sciences, technical training, medical and health-related fields, engineering, architecture, math, electronics and computer science. The course demonstrates the connection of physics to the real world while emphasizing the application of physics principles. There is a mandatory lab requirement and Regents exam.

Physical Setting/Physics Lab
The lab component is an integral part of the Physical Setting/Physics course, incorporating analysis, inquiry design, engineering design and information systems. Physics lab is required for all students taking Regents Physics. Any pupil enrolled in the course must complete the lab requirements. Students are required to complete a minimum of 1,200 minutes of laboratory experiences with successfully completed reports in order to qualify for the Regents exam in June.

Applied Chemistry
Prerequisite: Living Environment, Earth Science, Passed one Science Regents exam
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 11-12
This is an activity-based course that provides students with an introduction to the major concepts in chemistry and their application to our daily lives. Students will engage in scientific inquiry and practice the rules of safety required in a chemistry lab. The course focuses on the classification and structure of matter, the history of chemistry, the use of models, and experimental design. Topics vary based on student interest, but may include: separation techniques, types of chemical reactions, acids and bases, and the chemistry of food, industry, and the environment. While not as comprehensive or rigorous as Regents Chemistry, it is a college preparatory course for non-science majors. This course can also be taken before a student enters Regents Chemistry as an introduction to the major concepts of chemistry.

Astronomy
Prerequisite: Living Environment, Earth Science, Passed one Science Regents
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 11-12
This is a project-based, hands-on approach to the study of the universe. Students will use various computer programs and websites for course study. Topics include the sun and stars, planets and moons, extrasolar planets, black holes, galaxies, the formation of the universe and the history of space exploration. Students will be required to give oral presentations on their research.

Environmental Studies and Global Environment
Prerequisites: Earth Science, Living Environment, Passed two Science Regents
Credit: 1
Grade: 11-12
This course takes a solutions-based approach to investigating current and future environmental problems. Through a historical lens, students will analyze the current model of American society and how events since American settlement have fostered the normalities of urban and suburban planning, transportation, as well as food and energy production. What current environmental problems are resulting from this model? What scientific evidence do we have? What future problems may arise? What options do humans have in utilizing resources responsibly and equitably? These are some of the many questions that this course is designed to answer through a solutions and evidence-based approach. This course can be taken for a full year, elective science credit, or can be taken to earn 3 college credits through SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry. Information about the SUNY credits can be found below. Students that choose not to enroll in the College in the High School program can expect to follow a similar storyline, but with slightly different exam, paper and project expectations.

The flagship course is ESF’s environmental science course, Global Environment (EFB120, 3 college credits). Key environmental science themes and critical thinking skills form the basis for classroom and experiential learning activities. Global Environment’s interdisciplinary approach reflects our enduring belief that all students, regardless of their specific college and career paths, will benefit from an understanding of the linkages among human social systems and biophysical systems.

Students explore the relationships between their local rural, urban and suburban communities and the broad global context of environmental change. Opportunities abound for including course topics based on available local and regional resources as well as teacher interests, expertise and experiences. Ultimately, we seek to develop students and citizens who have a solid understanding of science and a sense of wonder and appreciation for the Earth as a system.

Credits and grades earned are recorded as part of each student’s permanent college academic record which can be transferred to other colleges and universities throughout the U.S. Official transcripts that indicate that the courses completed are college-level courses with college credit are available through the ESF Registrars’ office. While acceptance at other colleges and universities is not and cannot be guaranteed, credits earned with grades of C or higher typically can be applied to undergraduate degree requirements at many colleges and universities.

The basic program fee is $200 per 3-credit course. Students who are eligible for the Federal Free and Reduced School Lunch program will pay a discounted program fee of $75 per 3-credit course.

Forensics
Prerequisite: Earth Science, Living Environment, Passed one science Regents
Credits: 1/Full Year
Grades: 11-12
This course is an introduction to the science of crime scene investigation. It will introduce students to what evidence is, how it is collected, and the scientific foundation for the examination of physical, chemical, and biological items of evidence. In this class students will be exposed to all fields of forensic science and criminal studies. Students will participate in hands-on activities that will replicate actual procedures done by forensic personnel. Topics of study include fingerprints, blood spatter, toxicology, DNA, skeletal remains, hair and textiles, arson, bite-marks, and tool-marks. Students will participate in hands-on activities and labs as well as research and discuss forensic careers. Area professionals are invited to share their experiences. Students may take another science course concurrently in addition to this elective during their high school career.

Human Biology
(CHS – SUNY Schenectady – 4 College Credits)
Prerequisites: Regents Chemistry and Regents Physics (either may be taken concurrently with this course)
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grades: 12
This course is an introduction to the structure and function of the human body with an emphasis on anatomy and physiology of the major organ systems. The human body as a biological system having a hierarchical organization is explored. An understanding of cell and molecular biology, DNA synthesis and gene expression, and human diseases and disorders will be incorporated. Lab exercises use anatomical models, microscopes, dissections, virtual exercises and chemical analyses. Course expectations include independent work in the lab and online textbook learning outside of class. Students who are interested in a health-related career are strongly encouraged to enroll. However, this course is relevant for any student preparing for the rigors of college-level learning.

Applied Physics
Prerequisite: Living Environment, Earth Science, Passed one Science Regents exam
Credit: 1
Grades: 11-12
This is an activity-based course that provides students with an introduction to the major concepts in physics and their application to our daily lives. Students will engage in scientific inquiry and practice the rules of safety required in a physics lab. The course focuses on mechanics, energy, waves, electricity, new advances in the field of physics as well as incorporating the history of physics and experimental design. Topics vary based on student interest. While not as comprehensive or rigorous as Regents Physics, it is a college preparatory course for non-science majors. This course can also be taken before a student enters Regents Physics as an introduction to the major concepts of physics.

Social Studies

Upon completion of the Social Studies program, the successful student will be able to demonstrate the ability to make rational and informed decisions about economic, social, and political questions confronting himself or herself, the society, and the interdependent world. Such decisions will draw upon the lessons of history and the social sciences.

Global History I
Prerequisite: Social Studies for previous grade year
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 9
Students in this course gain an understanding of the six social studies practices and the 10 unifying historical themes that recur across time and place. With a focus on historical thinking and writing skills, students will gain a working knowledge of the challenges and issues that people have experienced over time, as well as the impact humans have had on our environment and each other.

Global History II
Prerequisite: Social Studies for previous grade year
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade 10
The New York State Global History and Geography Regents Exam is given at the end of 10th grade. It requires students to have some mastery over the six Social Studies practices and the 10 unifying historical themes that recur across time and place. Students should also have working knowledge of the challenges and issues that people have experienced over time, as well as the impact humans have had on our environment and each other.

U.S. History
Prerequisite: Social Studies 9/10
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 11
The New York State Regents exam, which is given at the end of 11th grade will require that all students have some mastery and understanding of the basic structure, function and operation of the American government. Students will also acquire knowledge concerning American History from the settling of the continent by Native Americans to present day.

AP U.S. History
Prerequisite: 90+ average in Social Studies 9/10 and teacher recommendation
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 11
This college-level course is designed to provide students with the analytic and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and material in U.S. history. Students will use analytical skills, along with research and argument to critically evaluate the facts and problems in U.S. history. The course prepares students for college courses by making demands upon them that are equivalent to those made by a full-year introductory college course. Students are expected to not merely recall historical facts, but to also assess their relevance, their reliability, and their importance to historical problems in U.S. history. Through both written and oral communication, students will make conclusions based on informed judgments. These conclusions should be clearly and persuasively presented throughout the school year.

Social Studies AIS Lab
Prerequisite: Placement based on Global History or U.S. History or US History and Government grade or Teacher/Counselor Recommendation
Credit: 0/Full Year
Grade: Mixed 9-12
The purpose of this lab is to focus on the content and skills needed for students to successfully complete either their Social Studies graduation requirements, including the Global History or U.S. History and Government Regents Exams. Multiple measures will be used to determine which students are recommended for Social Studies AIS lab. As part of the state-mandated Academic Intervention Services program, 11th grade students who fail the Global History Regents Exam or 12th grade students who fail the U.S. History Regents Exam will also be placed in this lab until they successfully complete the required examination.

Participation in Government
Prerequisite: Social Studies 9-11
Credit: .5/Half Year
Grade: 12
Creating good active citizens is the purpose of the course. The course emphasizes the interaction between citizens and government at all levels: local, state and federal. Good citizenship and student participation in the processes of government is encouraged. Participation in Government is a performance-based course.

Economics
Prerequisite: Social Studies 9-11
Credit: .5/Half Year
Grade: 12
This course includes the basic economic concepts and understanding that all people need to function effectively and intelligently in the modern world as citizens and participants in the economy of the United States and the world. This includes examining the nature of business, personal finance, supply and demand, as well as skills such as budgeting, filing taxes, investing in the stock market/retirement, and several others.

SUPA Economics ECN 203
Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation, 90+ cumulative GPA in Social Studies, enrollment in both SUPA Economics and Public Affairs
Credit: .5/Half Year (3 College Credits)
Grade: 12
This course is an introduction to mainstream economic thought designed for students with an interest in liberal arts. The goals of this course are to introduce students to the ideas that form the foundation of modern western (Neoclassical) economic thought, to examine the basic framework (the model) that economists have built on this foundation, and to show how this model is applied to current issues facing individuals and society. The process takes students from the microeconomic to the macroeconomic level, emphasizing the connection between these two perspectives. The course prepares students to analyze and understand the ongoing economic policy debate between interventionists and non-interventionists.

SUPA Policy Studies PST 101: Introduction to the Analysis of Public Policy
Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation, 90+ cumulative GPA in Social Studies, enrollment in both SUPA Economics and Public Affairs
Credit: .5/Half Year (3 College Credits)
Grade: 12
This course is designed to provide students with basic research, communication and decision-making skills used in public policy analysis. In addition, students are required to read and analyze articles from newspaper databases on local, state and national public policy issues. The student determines which public policy issues are initially chosen for study and the instructor determines the semester skills project. The content coverage of the course, while important, is secondary to the development of a range of applied social science skills that help the student make more informed choices as a citizen, worker and consumer.

Current Affairs in the 21st Century
Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 11-12
This exciting course allows students to discuss, examine and evaluate the important events and issues taking place around the world. The major goal of this class is for students to understand and appreciate the importance of world events in their life. Some topics covered include, but are not limited to: race and the American society, media, bias, philanthropy, and the impact of social media. Topics are covered monthly, but special emphasis is placed on staying up-to-date with news and events as they happen. This course is a must for students with an interest in current affairs and the events and issues that shape our world.

Psychology (DL)
Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5/Half Year
Grade: 11-12
The Psychology course involves a systematic analysis of the behavior of humans and some animals, and the study of basic psychological phenomena. Major topics include: introduction to research methods, major schools of thought, and the biological basis of behavior, consciousness, perception, learning, memory, motivation, abnormal behavior, and stress. Students will learn more about social and biological aspects of human behavior as they draw from the course material to gain insight into their life and the lives of those around them. This course seeks to follow the National High School Psychology Standards. Students will keep a journal, participate in various classroom activities, complete quarter projects, and take quizzes and tests in order to be evaluated.

Sociology (CHS)
Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5/Half Year – Spring (3 College Credits)
Grade: 11-12
This course involves a systematic introduction to the major sociological concepts for understanding the structure and dynamics of contemporary society. Major topics include an introduction to social methods of inquiry, major schools of thought, culture, social structure, socialization, self and social interaction, groups and social organizations, and racial and ethnic relations. Students will learn more about their interactions with other people and with social institutions as they proceed through this area of study. Students will participate in various classroom activities, complete a final project, and take quizzes and tests in order to be evaluated in this course.

Sports History (DL)
Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 11-12
This course journeys from the early American past to the present, giving students a compelling grasp of the historical evolution of American sporting practices. Students gain insight that will allow them to develop new and alternate perspectives, examine sports as a social and cultural phenomenon, generate a better understanding of current sport practices, and consider future developments of sport in American life.

World Languages

The World Languages program is offered in grades 9-12. We strive toward the following goals:

  • Keep the second language alive by using it in the classroom. Teach students to understand, speak, read and write a second language
  • Encourage students to continue the study of a second language long enough to attain proficiency in the four skills.
  • Promote an understanding and appreciation of the value system and behavior patterns of the people whose language students are studying.

Students pursuing an Advanced Regents diploma must take three years of a language and pass the comprehensive department examination for the language. Second language training is advisable for the student who might want to attend a two- or four-year college, receive vocational or technical training, or develop skills which will enhance his/her life experiences through travel, communications, or knowledge of other cultures.

Spanish Culture and Traditions
Prerequisite: Teacher/counselor recommendation
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 9-12
This course is open to students who have been selected through the cooperation of their teacher and guidance counselor as either struggling or unable to achieve the minimum requirements for completion of their one credit of high school foreign language, and will not be continuing in a foreign language sequence for an Advanced Regents diploma. This student may not progress to Level II Spanish without taking and passing the traditional Level I Spanish class.

Spanish Level I
Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 9-12
In Spanish Level I, basic dialogues and patterns of Spanish are drilled to develop a degree of fluency and a mastery of basic grammatical concepts. Elementary reading and writing are introduced. Cultural aspects of the language and Spanish-speaking peoples are explored. Special emphasis is placed on listening comprehension and conversational skills.

Spanish Level II
Prerequisite: Spanish I
Credit: 1/Full Year
Grade: 9-12
Emphasis is placed on an audio-lingual approach to develop language skills. Longer reading passages are introduced. More writing is emphasized by answering questions related to reading passages and free questions based on vocabulary dealing with school, family, sports, etc. There is a review of basic grammar structures and an introduction to more complex grammar patterns with a continued study of cultural concerns via use of the Internet, DVDs and videos.

Spanish Level III
Prerequisite: Spanish II
Credit: 1/Full Year Advanced Regents Credit
Grade: 10-12
In Spanish Level III, the course consists of mastering all language skills with an emphasis on auditory and reading comprehension. A review of all grammatical structures with liberated writing in guided composition work and visual and auditory dialogue is also included. There will be continued study of cultural material dialogue in the foreign language. A final exam comprising the four skills of the former New York State Regents is taken at the end of the course for validation of checkpoint “B” of the New York State Syllabus.

Spanish Level IV (UHS – UAlbany)
Prerequisite: Comprehensive department exam in Spanish, permission of instructor
Credit: 1/Full Year (4 College Credits – ASPN 201)
Grade: 11
Students’ ability to communicate in and comprehend Spanish will develop along with their knowledge of the language’s vocabulary and grammatical structures. Mastery of these skills will be enhanced through cultural awareness. This course is designed to give students an opportunity to earn college credit at UAlbany, which can be transferred to other colleges. The syllabus followed is in cooperation with the SUNY Albany UHS Program.

Spanish Level V (UHS – UAlbany)
Prerequisite: Spanish IV, teacher recommendation
Credit: 1/Full Year (4 College Credits – ASPN201)
Grade: 12
The primary emphasis of the course is placed on readings, short compositions and class discussions. Students will use the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing in Spanish, and gain knowledge of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. They will also develop insight into the nature of language and culture through comparison. Videos will be used as part of instruction. Successful completion of the course will render college credits at UAlbany, which can be transferred to other colleges. The syllabus followed is in cooperation with the UAlbany UHS Program.

Career & Technical Education

Career & Technical Education is offered to our students through Capital Region BOCES at multiple campuses in the area. Enrolling in CTE courses provides our students with the opportunity to immerse themselves in a trade or profession learning the skills necessary to gain employment upon graduating and completing their program. Students choosing the CTE course of study spend half of their day at the BOCES campus and half of their day at the high school working on the courses they need to earn their credits towards graduation.

Auto Body Refinishing
Credit: 4/Full Year
Grade: 11-12
Auto Body Collision Repair and Refinishing Technology is a two-year program in which students learn about ever-changing materials, methods and technology in this high-paying industry. Students explore career opportunities as well as participate in a work-based learning experience at various local collision repair centers.

Auto Body Collision Refinishing
Credit: 4/Full Year
Grade: 11-12
Students learn how to repair and refinish today’s vehicles and return them to pre-accident condition. They use single-stage paint, base clear coat as well as three stage pearl finishes. From preparing for paint to spraying paint and adding the final details, students learn what is needed to get cars looking good again. Students also work towards obtaining an Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certification.

Automotive Services/Small Engine Repair
Credit: 4/Full Year
Grade: 11-12
Students in this program learn about basic automotive and small engine maintenance and repair, service station duties, and exhaust and engine systems. They work on actual customers’ vehicles and engines and build important skills such as teamwork, communication and customer service. Upon completion, they are prepared to take the New York State Inspection License Exam, may continue their studies in the Automotive Trades Technology program, or enter the workforce. Auto Services/Small Engine Repair is a Career Studies Program for students who want to learn hands-on at an alternative pace. The program meets individualized educational program provisions through challenging, developmentally appropriate career prep experiences.

Automotive Trades Technology I, II
Credit: 4/Full Year
Grade: 11-12
From computerized diagnostics to hands-on repair, students in the Automotive Trades Technology program learn how to service and maintain all types of cars and light trucks. This two-year program covers a range of topics, from engine theory and specialized tools and equipment to customer service and shop management. Students work on late-model vehicles donated by auto manufacturers as well as actual customers’ vehicles that are brought in for servicing and repair.

AYES Automotive Technician
Credit: 4/Two Years
Grade: 11-12
The Automotive Youth Educational Systems (AYES) Automotive Technician program is a national auto industry program supported by BMW, Chrysler, GM, Honda, Hyundai, Kia, Mercedes Benz, Subaru and Toyota. Students acquire extensive work experience, learn the basics of auto technology and work as paid interns at sponsoring auto dealerships. They also earn college credit and work toward an associate’s degree through Hudson Valley Community College. A tool scholarship enables students to earn a starter set of tools at a dramatically discounted price. Students interested in enrolling in AYES must complete an application and interview.

Building Trades I, II
Credit: 4/Full Year
Grade: 11-12
Opportunities abound for trained construction and renovation professionals. Students in the Building Trades program at the Albany campus learn through standardized craft training programs developed by the Home Builders Institute (HBI) and the National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER). On-campus and community projects provide valuable real-life experience. Students who pass written exams and performance tests gain a portable skill set and may earn HBI and NCCER certifications, which are recognized by contractors and employers nationwide.

Carpentry Services
Credit: 4/Full Year
Grades: 11-12
Individuals trained and experienced in carpentry and building maintenance are always in demand in construction. Carpentry Services students learn the skills needed for entry-level positions in construction and building maintenance. Upon completion, they may continue their studies in Building Trades or enter the workforce. Carpentry Services is a Career Studies program for students who want to learn hands-on at an alternative pace. The program meets individualized educational program provisions through challenging, developmentally appropriate career prep experiences.

Commercial Construction/Heavy Equipment
Credit: 4/Full Year
Grade: 11-12
Through standardized craft training programs developed by the National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Commercial Construction/Heavy Equipment students learn workplace safety and management, tools, site development, layout, blueprints and codes, soils, erosion control and storm-water management, structures, utilities, concrete and form construction, rough framing, and green construction. They also learn how to operate and maintain compaction equipment, backhoes, bulldozers and excavators. Students may test for nationally recognized NCCER certification. Upon completion, they may further their education through the Residential Construction/Heavy Equipment program or enter the workforce, an apprenticeship or college.

Residential Construction/Heavy Equipment
Credit: 4/Full Year
Grade: 11-12
This program prepares students for entry-level employment or further education. Students rotate through three key areas: general construction techniques and tools, preventive equipment maintenance, and equipment operation. They learn through standardized craft training programs developed by the National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER) and the Home Builders Institute (HBI) of the National Association of Home Builders. Topics of study include workplace safety and management, tools, blueprints and framing, and operation and maintenance of backhoes, skid steers and excavators. Students build communication and employability skills and may earn math credit. Work-based experiences, field trips, guest speakers and competitions reinforce hands-on and classroom learning. Students who pass written and performance exams can earn NCCER and/or HBI certifications, which are recognized nationwide by contractors and employers.

Cosmetology I, II
Credit: 4/Full Year
Grade: 11-12
Cosmetology students learn the competencies and skills needed to pass the New York State Board practical and written licensing exams through a program that meets the state-required 1,000 hours of instruction. Students attend Cosmetology for two years plus summer school. They apply theory and skills and strengthen competencies through hands-on experiences including a clinic open to the community, as well as participating in a salon internship.

Criminal Justice I, II
Credit: 4/Full Year
Grade: 11-12
Security, law enforcement and the criminal justice field are central to sound management of public and private enterprise. The program teaches students about the history, theory, practices and recent developments in these professions. They learn about police, court and prison systems, operation of security and protection programs, and procedures in public, commercial and residential settings. Hands-on learning teaches patrolling and investigative skills, including radio use, note-taking, evidence gathering, and dealing with safety hazards and emergency situations, as well as lifting fingerprints, photographing and diagramming crime scenes, using surveillance cameras. Criminal Justice students also study civil and criminal law. Students completing the program may enter the profession or continue their education at college or law enforcement or protection academies. Those who are age 18 or older may test for New York State Security Officer certification.

Culinary Arts & Hospitality Technology I, II
Credit: 4/Full Year
Grade: 11-12
Culinary Arts & Hospitality Technology is certified as an American Culinary Federation (ACF) ACCESS program, and faculty are ACF-Certified Executive Chefs and Certified Chef Educators. Learning takes place in the classroom, kitchen, Café Anders and dining room. Students also intern at local restaurants, hotels and other businesses and participate in public service events and culinary skills competitions.

Culinary Arts Tech Prep
Credit: 4/Full Year
Grade: 11-12
Culinary Arts Tech Prep enables high school seniors to earn up to 9 credit hours through Schenectady County Community College, 15 credit hours through Johnson & Wales University (transferable from SCCC), and certification through the American Culinary Federation (ACF) ACCESS program. Students learn in the classroom, kitchen, Café Anders and dining room. They also participate in public service events and culinary skills competitions. Career & Tech is an ACF Blue Ribbon ACCESS School.

Culinary – Food Services
Food Services students prepare for a range of positions by learning in a professional kitchen and dining room, as well as in the classroom. Students put their skills to the test with actual customers in school and the community, and job placement assistance is provided. Students completing Food Services will have valuable, independent living skills and may begin working or advance to the Culinary Arts & Hospitality Technology program. Food Services is a career studies program for students who want to learn hands-on at a modified pace. The program is designed to meet individualized educational program provisions through challenging, developmentally appropriate career prep experiences. Career Studies programs are taught by teachers with substantial real-world experience in their trades.

Diesel Tech I, II
(Medium/Heavy Duty Truck Repair)
Credit: 4/Full Year
Grade: 11-12
Medium/Heavy Duty Truck Repair students work on late model trucks and diesel engines. They learn electrical and electronic theory, which they apply to computerized control systems used on today’s trucks, and learn how to service and maintain steering, suspension, chassis and braking systems. They also learn about alternative fuels including biodiesel, and about hybrid vehicle technology. Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) style testing during the program prepares students to pursue certification after graduation. Upon completion, students may secure employment as entry-level technicians or advance their education and training. Medium/Heavy Duty Truck Repair at BOCES Career & Tech is the only high school-level program in the state to earn certification by the National Automotive Technician Education Foundation/Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (NATEF/ASE).

Digital Media Design I, II
Credit: 4/Full Year
Grades 11-12
Digital Medial prepares students for creative careers in web design communications, graphic design and other related areas. During the two-year program, students develop professional-level skills in Adobe software applications. They learn to apply design processes and design theory in order to improve the quality of their work. Students completing the program are prepared for rigorous college and post-secondary programs and/or qualified for entry-level jobs with the visual communications field.

Electrical Trades I, II
Credit: 4/Full Year
Grade: 11-12
Students in the Electrical Trades program learn about residential and commercial/industrial wiring, motors and generators, alarm systems and basic electrical logic circuits, and they work on projects such as wiring a modular home. The program prepares students to earn certification through the National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER).

Engineering Technician
To create a steady pipeline of technicians, GLOBALFOUNDRIES, in collaboration with Capital Region BOCES Career & Technical School, will train and prepare students for careers in the U.S., and around the world, as maintenance technicians, process technicians and production technicians. Students learn about the semiconductor industry, as well as clean room protocol, safety, electronics, hand tool usage, automation, tool extraction and repair, valve operation and repair and much more. Those completing the course are eligible to be interviewed for a position at GLOBALFOUNDRIES.

Entertainment Technology
Explore what happens backstage and in the studios through Entertainment Technology, a program offered in partnership with Proctors in Schenectady. The program is based in classrooms, a studio theatre and for the senior year Proctors where students experience the world of theatre and film production, hands-on building skills and knowledge. Students learn about the technical aspects of theatre and film production including history, art and design interpretation, scenery, construction and painting techniques, tools and equipment, sound and recording, stage electrics and lighting, costuming and makeup. Backstage education is complemented by experiences in performance, art, music and practical building trades in a fun and creative atmosphere. Internships and job shadowing advance students’ marketable skills while helping them explore careers. First-year students can earn credit for integrated science, and second-year students can earn credit for integrated English. Upon completion of the program, students are well-prepared to continue their studies at college or enter the workforce. This program is a direct pathway into the Entertainment Technology program at Fulton-Montgomery Community College (FMCC).

Game Design/Implementation I, II
Credit: 4/Two Years
Students learn the history of games from ancient times to present. They create board games, card games and dice games while learning the fundamentals of Game Design. Then students create digital games using Game Maker software, Game Salad and Unity. Students also explore various art concepts during the first year and 3D modeling during the second year. Finally, students will design their own video games in groups as well as create a virtual video game design company.

Global Fashion Studies I, II
Credit: 4/Full Year
Grade: 11-12
New York has long been the center of the fashion, apparel and accessories industries. Global Fashion Studies prepares students for careers and higher education in these exciting and ever-changing fields. In this two-year program, students learn about garment theory, textiles, manufacturing, sales and promotion, and career and college opportunities. Global Fashion Studies year one focuses on merchandising, and year two focuses on marketing and retailing including mastery of skill standards set by the National Retail Federation. Students learn through specialized software, hands-on projects, lectures and guest speakers, videos, field trips, work-based learning experiences such as job shadowing and internships, and community service. Through a yearlong entrepreneurship project, students work together to design a product, conduct market research and produce and sell their creations. They also create a professional portfolio showcasing their best work.

HVAC/R I, II (Heating, Ventilation, AC & Refrigeration)
Credit: 4/Full Year
Grade: 11-12
The heating, ventilation, air conditioning and refrigeration (HVAC/R) field offers job opportunities which outnumber qualified professionals in the Capital Region and beyond. The HVAC/R program gives students a solid career foundation. In a state-of-the-art classroom, they learn about ventilation, piping, refrigerants and refrigeration, furnaces and boilers. Students completing this program are prepared to test for federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certification, which is required to work in the industry. They also may earn Home Builders Institute and HVAC Excellence certification.

Internet Application Design
Credit: 4/Full Year
Grade: 11-12
Students interested in designing for the web, creating smartphone apps or videos, or learning about the latest security software will love Internet Application Design. This one-year course teaches web technology for designers, video creation, internet security, servers, e-commerce and smartphone applications. Students also focus on modules such as animation, digital photography, audio, and video, Webcomics, game design, desktop publishing, programming and interfaces. They are prepared to take Adobe Certified Associate exams in Dreamweaver and Flash. Upon completion, they may continue their studies in Gaming, Multimedia & Web Design, or Computer & Network Technician/Information Technology or at college.

Manufacturing & Machine Tech I, II
Grade: 11-12
Manufacturing & Machining Technology was developed in cooperation with local business and industry, colleges and professional associations to meet our region’s growing demand for advanced manufacturing professionals. This program is held at the Mohonasen Center for Advanced Technology in partnership with Career & Tech. Students focus on skilled manufacturing, machining and advanced manufacturing, and learn how products are taken from concept to consumer using the latest technology to compete in a global marketplace. They learn computer aided design (CAD), engineering drawing and sketching and a number of computer programs used in today’s highly technical manufacturing operations. Students benefit from partnerships with advanced manufacturers such as Greno Industries Inc., GE Energy, Simmons Machine Tool, PVA and Atlas Copco, who offer opportunities for field trips, job shadowing and internships.

Network Cabling/Smartphone Technology I, II
Every building in America is wire with either traditional copper wire or fiber optic cable. As society becomes more and more reliant on instantaneous communication and data retrieval, the importance of this wire and cable grows.

Network cable technicians are the men and women who install the networks, wire and cables that connect computers, telephones and energy management systems. This program utilizes C-tech, an international workforce development company specializing in curriculum development to provide industry-recognized certificates. Students can begin careers in telecommunications, audio/visual and telephone industries, or have a head start on careers as they pursue further education.

Direct Support Professional/Certified Nurse Assistant/Home Health Aide/Personal Care Aide
Students will learn through clinical training and classroom preparation how to provide valuable skills in conjunction with professional nurses in a home health care setting. Services range from health-related tasks such as obtaining vital signs to doing laundry, personal care and housekeeping. Students will complete 108 hours in a clinical setting. New for the 2020-21 school year, students will also learn about the burgeoning demand for DSPs. These professionals assist people with developmental disabilities of all ages and ability levels. Students learn the skills necessary for a career that is all about helping people with developmental disabilities live fulfilling lives. Students gain such important skills as putting people first, developing positive relationships, being professional, supporting the health and safety of a person with a developmental disability, assisting them in their needs for life at home and being active members of their community, the health and safety of a person with a developmental disability, and assisting them in their needs for life at home and being active members of their community.

Practical Nursing
Nursing is one of the nation’s fastest growing and highest-demand jobs, offering ambitious men and women a challenge with many rewards. The Practical Nursing for Adult Students program encompasses 1,100 hours of classroom and clinical study and offers both full-day and part-time study programs. Students learn about all levels of patient care, and they participate in hands-on, supervised clinical experiences at local health care facilities. Upon completion, they are prepared to take the National Council Licensure Examination to become Licensed Practical Nurses. The program also provides a solid foundation for college. Satisfactory completion of an entrance exam is required of all students enrolling in Practical Nursing.

Service Pet Tech
Pet Tech is a program designed for students who are interested in working with small domestic animals to learn basic care. Skills taught include pet grooming, care and best practices for boarding animals. Students also learn about customer service, written and spoken communication, office and computer skills, phone etiquette, budgeting and money management, inventory and ordering, advertising, basic accounting and business math – all skills necessary to operate in a business and retail setting. Pet Tech also builds skills in problem-solving and organizing.

Retail & Office Services
Credit: 4/Full Year
Retail & Office Services students build skills in problem solving, organizing, business and telephone etiquette, and working as a team. They rotate through internships in retail and office locations. Students work hands-on and as a team at the Campus Store and Real World Fashion Boutique as well as in the classroom. By gaining experience in the classroom and in the field, Retail & Office Services students will be well-prepared to not only get a job, but to keep it. They benefit both personally and professionally. Retail & Office Services is a Career Studies program for students who want to learn hands-on, at an alternative pace. The program is designed to meet all the provisions of each student’s individualized educational program through providing challenging, developmentally appropriate career prep experiences.

Sterile Processing Tech I, II
Credit: 4/Full Year
Sterile Processing Technicians serve a vital role in the healthcare industry, combating the spread of hospital-borne illnesses, as well as diseases. Students will learn about infection control practices, decontamination and sterilization guidelines and protocols, microbiology, anatomy, medical terminology and surgical procedures, and various material management functions. Those who complete the course and pass certification can find employment in hospitals, ambulatory surgery centers, medical laboratories, birth centers and other facilities where sterilized equipment is needed.

Welding & Metal Fabrication I, II
Credit: 4/Full Year
The Welding & Metal Fabrication program teaches students the skills and techniques necessary for success in a field that values well trained, experienced workers. Students learn shielded metal arc welding (stick), MIG, flux cored and TIG welding, and automated Orbital TIG welding. They also learn about the operation of welding and metal fabrication machinery, blueprint reading, clean room environments and shop theory. Upon completion of the Welding & Metal Fabrication program, students are prepared to enter the workforce or go on for more advanced training at specialized technical schools or colleges.

Theatre and Film Production Technology I & II
Prerequisite: None
Credit: 4/Full Year
Grade: 11-12
Explore what happens backstage and in the studios through Theatre and Film Production Technology, a program offered in partnership with the Mohonasen Center for Advanced Technology and Proctors Theatre in Schenectady. The program is based in classrooms, a studio theatre and in visits to professional theaters where students experience the world of theatre and film production, hands-on building skills and knowledge. Theatre and Film Production Technology students learn about the technical aspects of theatre and film production including history, art and design interpretation, scenery, construction and painting techniques, tools and equipment, sound and recording, stage electric and lighting, costuming and makeup. Backstage education is complemented by experiences in performance, art, music and practical building trades in a fun and creative atmosphere. Internships and job shadowing advance students’ marketable skills while helping them explore career opportunities. First-year students can earn credit for integrated science, and second-year students can earn credit for integrated English. Upon completion of the program, students are well-prepared to continue their studies at college or enter the workforce.

Vocational Training and Transition
Prerequisite: None
Credit: 4/Full Year
Grade: 11-12
Self-confidence. Independence. Work experience. Job training. The Vocational Training & Transition program at the Albany campus provides students with the opportunity to put all of the pieces together and start building a future. Students discover their strengths, build self-esteem and gain confidence in their abilities. At the same time, they receive training with an emphasis on job-related skills, leadership and organizational skills, and decision-making skills. This program is for students who want to learn hands-on, at an alternative pace. These programs are designed to meet all the provisions of each student’s individualized educational program through providing challenging, developmentally appropriate career prep experiences.