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Schalmont Central School District
Imran Abbasi, Principal
 
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1 Sabre Drive, Schenectady, NY 12306 • Phone: 518.355.6110 Fax: 518.355.8720

2017-18 Course Guide

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Social Studies

Upon completion of the social studies program, the successful student will be able to demonstrate the ability to make rational and informed decisions about economic, social, and political questions confronting himself or herself, the society, and the interdependent world. Such decisions will draw upon the lessons of history and the social sciences.

Social Studies 9/10 – Global History I, II

Prerequisite – Social Studies for previous grade year
2 Years – 2 Credits
Grades 9-10

The New York State Regents exam, which is given at the end of 10th grade encompasses two years’ work. It requires students to have some mastery over the five social studies standards, common themes that recur across time and place, and eight historical eras. Students should also have a general knowledge of the similarities and differences of the people and events across political boundaries and time.

Social Studies 11 – U.S. History

Prerequisite – Social Studies 9/10
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grade 11

The New York State Regents exam, which is given at the end of 11th grade will require that all students have some mastery and understanding of the basic structure, function, and operation of the American government. Students should also have a good knowledge and values base rooted in historical tradition as well as contemporaneous society.

Social Studies 11 – U.S. History (AP)

Prerequisite – 90+ average in Social Studies 9/10 and teacher recommendation
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grade 11

This college-level course is designed to provide students with the analytic and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and material in U.S. history. Students will use analytical skills, along with research and argument to critically evaluate the facts and problems in U.S. history. The course prepares students for college courses by making demands upon them that are equivalent to those made by a full-year introductory college course. Students are expected to not merely recall historical facts, but to also assess their relevance, their reliability, and their importance to historical problems in U.S. history. Through both written and oral communication, students will make conclusions based on informed judgments. These conclusions should be clearly and persuasively presented throughout the school year.

Social Studies AIS Lab

Prerequisite – Placement based on Global History grade and performance on Global History or U.S. History Regents exams
1 Year – No Credit
Grade 11

The purpose of this lab is to focus on the content and skills needed for students to successfully complete either the Global History or U.S. History Regents exam requirements. Multiple measures will be used to determine which students are recommended for social studies AIS lab. As part of the state mandated Academic Intervention Services program, 11th grade students who fail the Global History Regents or 12th grade students who fail the U.S. History Regents will also be placed in this lab until they successfully complete the required examination.

Participation in Government

Prerequisite – Social Studies 9-11
½ Year – ½ Credit
Grade 12

Creating good active citizens is the purpose of the course. The course emphasizes the interaction between citizens and government at all levels: local, state and federal. Good citizenship and student participation in the processes of government is encouraged. Participation in Government is a performance based course.

Economics

Prerequisite – Social Studies 9-11
½ Year – ½ Credit
Grade 12

This course includes the basic economic concepts and understandings that all people need to function effectively and intelligently as citizens and participants in the economy of the United States and the world.

Economics ECN 203 (SUPA) (3 College Credits)

Prerequisite – Teacher recommendation, 90+ cumulative GPA in Social Studies, enrollment in both SUPA Economics and Public Affairs
½ Year – ½ Credit
Grade 12

This course is an introduction to mainstream economic thought designed for students with an interest in liberal arts. The goals of this course are to introduce students to the ideas that form the foundation of modern western (Neo Classical) economic thought, to examine the basic framework (the model) that economists have built on this foundation, and to show how this model is applied to current issues facing individuals and society. The process takes students from the microeconomic to the macroeconomic level, emphasizing the connection between these two perspectives. The course prepares students to analyze and understand the on-going economic policy debate between interventionists and non-interventionists.

Public Affairs 101:
Introduction to the Analysis of Public Policy (SUPA)
(3 College Credits)

Prerequisite – Teacher recommendation, 90+ cumulative GPA in Social Studies,
enrollment in both SUPA Economics and Public Affairs
½ Year – ½ Credit
Grade 12

This course is designed to provide students with basic research, communication, and decision-making skills used in public policy analysis.In addition, students are required to read and analyze articles from newspaper databases on local, state, and international public policy issues. The instructor determines which public policy issues are chosen for study throughout the semester. The content coverage of the course, while important, is secondary to the development of a range of applied social science skills that help the student make more informed choices as a citizen, worker, and consumer.

Social Studies Electives

Current Affairs in the 21st Century (DL)

Prerequisite – None
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 11-12

This exciting course allows students to discuss, examine, and evaluate the important events and issues taking place around the world. The major goal of this class is for students to understand and appreciate the importance of world events in their life. Some topics covered include, but not limited to: the global impact of Twitter, Facebook, and other forms of social media; the impact of steroids and other PED’s on sports; media bias; and the decline of American morals and values. Topics are covered monthly, but special emphasis is placed on staying up-to-date with news and events as they happen. This course is participation and technology-centered. Each student will be assigned a Google Chromebook. The device becomes students for the year and contains all books and readings for the course. This course is a must for students with an interest in current affairs and the events and issues that shape our world.

Holocaust Studies DL

Prerequisite – None
½ Year – ½ Credit
Grades 10-12

Never Again. This was the vow we took at the conclusion of World War II. In order to assure that such a horrible time in our history does not repeat itself, it is important for students to understand exactly now Adolf Hitler came to power, legally, in a democratic nation. Once appointed chancellor, he proceeded to methodically remove civil liberties from a small group who often lived on the fringe of society. Yet few German citizens were willing to speak out. This course will focus on learning about the moral, political, and social implications of human behavior. By way of primary source documents, films, literature and discussion, Holocaust Studies will go beyond WW II to examine themes of justice, race, genocide, stereotypes, diversity, and tolerance. We will also spend time discussing additional examples of genocide, including Armenia, Cambodia, Rwanda and Darfur. This course is appropriate for mature students in grades 10-12 who are comfortable discussing sensitive, controversial subjects and sometimes viewing graphic footage.

Psychology (DL)

Prerequisite – None
½ Year – ½ Credit
Grades 11-12

The psychology course involves a systematic analysis of the behavior of humans and some animals, and the study of basic psychological phenomena. Major topics include: introduction to research methods, major schools of thought, the biological basis of behavior, consciousness, perception, learning, memory, motivation, abnormal behavior, and stress. Students will learn more about social and biological aspects of human behavior as they draw from the course material to gain insight into their life and the lives of those around them. This course seeks to follow the National High School Psychology Standards. Students will keep a journal, participate in various classroom activities, complete quarter projects, and take quizzes and tests in order to be evaluated.

Sociology (CHS) (3 College Credits)

Prerequisite – None
½ Year – 1 Credit
Grades 11-12

This course involves a systematic introduction to the major sociological concepts for understanding the structure and dynamics of contemporary society. Major topics include an introduction to social methods of inquiry, major schools of thought, culture, social structure, socialization, self and social interaction, groups and social organizations, and racial and ethnic relations. Students will learn more about their interactions with other people and with social institutions as they proceed through this area of study. Students will participate in various classroom activities, complete a final project, and take quizzes and tests in order to be evaluated in this course.

Sports History (DL)

Prerequisite – None
1 Year – 1 Credit
Grades 11-12

This course journeys from the early American past to the present, giving students a compelling grasp of the historical evolution of American sporting practices. Students gain insight that will allow them to develop new and alternate perspectives, examine sports as a social and cultural phenomenon, generate a better understanding of current sport practices, and consider future developments of sport in American life.

World History Through Women’s Eyes (DL)

Prerequisite – None
½ Year – ½ Credit
Grades 10-12

Most of our history curriculum is driving by the thoughts, actions and ideals of men. Have you ever wondered what world history looks like through a woman’s eyes? Why is it that during time periods considered “progressive” such as the Golden Age of Athens and the Renaissance periods, women were expected to stay home and tend to the children? Is women’s fashion driven by the needs and tastes of women, or is it an attempt to control and coerce them into a role “society” believes they should fill? How do women living in traditionally male-dominated societies such as China and India find ways to preserve autonomy and independence? When certain historical events are caused by a “breakdown of traditional roles and values,” is that necessarily a bad thing? Through literatures, artwork and research, students enrolled in this course will answer all of these questions and more. This course is geared towards juniors and seniors, however, motivated sophomores will benefit from seeing an alternative perspective on their required Global Studies course work.

 



More Information

Counselors

Department Coordinators

  • English, 9-12:
    Kevin Curtin x3510
  • Math, 9-12:
    Natalie Casalinuovo x3504
  • Music, K-12"
    Mike Christy x3021
  • Science, 9-12:
    Becky Remis x3560
  • Social Studies:
    9-12 Adam Dolan x3521
  • Foreign Language 7-12:
    Fred Orlando x3529

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